This summer’s museum trip to Côte d’Ivoire introduced us to Ivoirian artists and gave me the chance to see art works that I have come to know well as museum objects in new contexts. We commissioned masquerades in each of the three primary cultural regions visited―giving us the rare chance to see this performance art in action.
In the Dan village of Booni, near the Liberian border, a graceful dean gle mask performed. Dean gle plays a peacemaking role in the community―a beautiful example from our collection is at upper right. In Bendekouassikro, in central Baule country, the town’s renowned mask company (note the t-shirt and blue and white woven skirt of the man on the lower left) fêted us with goli, typically a day-long series of jubilant entertainment dances, featuring four pairs of masked dancers. We visited on a Wednesday, the day typically taken away from farming, which meant that the entire community took part. Finally, in Waraniéné in the north, Senufo performers shared a nufori dance, in which performers in full-body panther costumes (themselves members of the secret Poro society) both frighten and entertain with their deft acrobatic gestures.
Clips from all three days of performance will be on view when Double Take: African Innovations, our reinstallation of Brooklyn’s African collection, opens on October 29th.


Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo
This summer’s museum trip to Côte d’Ivoire introduced us to Ivoirian artists and gave me the chance to see art works that I have come to know well as museum objects in new contexts. We commissioned masquerades in each of the three primary cultural regions visited―giving us the rare chance to see this performance art in action.
In the Dan village of Booni, near the Liberian border, a graceful dean gle mask performed. Dean gle plays a peacemaking role in the community―a beautiful example from our collection is at upper right. In Bendekouassikro, in central Baule country, the town’s renowned mask company (note the t-shirt and blue and white woven skirt of the man on the lower left) fêted us with goli, typically a day-long series of jubilant entertainment dances, featuring four pairs of masked dancers. We visited on a Wednesday, the day typically taken away from farming, which meant that the entire community took part. Finally, in Waraniéné in the north, Senufo performers shared a nufori dance, in which performers in full-body panther costumes (themselves members of the secret Poro society) both frighten and entertain with their deft acrobatic gestures.
Clips from all three days of performance will be on view when Double Take: African Innovations, our reinstallation of Brooklyn’s African collection, opens on October 29th.


Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo
This summer’s museum trip to Côte d’Ivoire introduced us to Ivoirian artists and gave me the chance to see art works that I have come to know well as museum objects in new contexts. We commissioned masquerades in each of the three primary cultural regions visited―giving us the rare chance to see this performance art in action.
In the Dan village of Booni, near the Liberian border, a graceful dean gle mask performed. Dean gle plays a peacemaking role in the community―a beautiful example from our collection is at upper right. In Bendekouassikro, in central Baule country, the town’s renowned mask company (note the t-shirt and blue and white woven skirt of the man on the lower left) fêted us with goli, typically a day-long series of jubilant entertainment dances, featuring four pairs of masked dancers. We visited on a Wednesday, the day typically taken away from farming, which meant that the entire community took part. Finally, in Waraniéné in the north, Senufo performers shared a nufori dance, in which performers in full-body panther costumes (themselves members of the secret Poro society) both frighten and entertain with their deft acrobatic gestures.
Clips from all three days of performance will be on view when Double Take: African Innovations, our reinstallation of Brooklyn’s African collection, opens on October 29th.


Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo
This summer’s museum trip to Côte d’Ivoire introduced us to Ivoirian artists and gave me the chance to see art works that I have come to know well as museum objects in new contexts. We commissioned masquerades in each of the three primary cultural regions visited―giving us the rare chance to see this performance art in action.
In the Dan village of Booni, near the Liberian border, a graceful dean gle mask performed. Dean gle plays a peacemaking role in the community―a beautiful example from our collection is at upper right. In Bendekouassikro, in central Baule country, the town’s renowned mask company (note the t-shirt and blue and white woven skirt of the man on the lower left) fêted us with goli, typically a day-long series of jubilant entertainment dances, featuring four pairs of masked dancers. We visited on a Wednesday, the day typically taken away from farming, which meant that the entire community took part. Finally, in Waraniéné in the north, Senufo performers shared a nufori dance, in which performers in full-body panther costumes (themselves members of the secret Poro society) both frighten and entertain with their deft acrobatic gestures.
Clips from all three days of performance will be on view when Double Take: African Innovations, our reinstallation of Brooklyn’s African collection, opens on October 29th.


Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo

This summer’s museum trip to Côte d’Ivoire introduced us to Ivoirian artists and gave me the chance to see art works that I have come to know well as museum objects in new contexts. We commissioned masquerades in each of the three primary cultural regions visited―giving us the rare chance to see this performance art in action.

In the Dan village of Booni, near the Liberian border, a graceful dean gle mask performed. Dean gle plays a peacemaking role in the communitya beautiful example from our collection is at upper right. In Bendekouassikro, in central Baule country, the town’s renowned mask company (note the t-shirt and blue and white woven skirt of the man on the lower left) fêted us with goli, typically a day-long series of jubilant entertainment dances, featuring four pairs of masked dancers. We visited on a Wednesday, the day typically taken away from farming, which meant that the entire community took part. Finally, in Waraniéné in the north, Senufo performers shared a nufori dance, in which performers in full-body panther costumes (themselves members of the secret Poro society) both frighten and entertain with their deft acrobatic gestures.

Clips from all three days of performance will be on view when Double Take: African Innovations, our reinstallation of Brooklyn’s African collection, opens on October 29th.

Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle

The dip in temperature means it’s almost time to say farewell to the Sackler Center’s current exhibition Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work, 1963-1974. This show provides a unique opportunity to see Chicago’s evolution as an artist, and to experience her most famous work, The Dinner Party, in the context of her journey from minimalism to feminism.  It has been exciting to introduce audiences to aspects of Chicago’s work that were not well known on the East Coast, particularly her ephemeral, site-specific outdoor Atmosphere pieces from the 1960s and 70s. In addition to showing historic photographs of this series, on April 26, 2014, we were thrilled to welcome nearly ten thousand people to Prospect Park’s Long Meadow to experience a new Atmosphere work. A Butterfly for Brooklyn, which expanded on Chicago’s 1974 A Butterfly for Oakland, featured a 200-foot wide by 180-foot high sparkling, exploding butterfly, Chicago’s largest installationever. This monumental public project and our exhibition were part of a year of activities celebrating Chicago’s seventy-fifth birthday.
While Chicago in L.A. closes on September 28, the section devoted to her groundbreaking teaching and institution-building projects, Judy Chicago’s Feminist Pedagogy and Alternative Spaces, will remain on view in the Herstory Gallery through November 16. Up next in the main galleries, Judith Scott – Bound and Unbound opens October 24! 

Posted by Saisha M. Grayson
ZoomInfo
The dip in temperature means it’s almost time to say farewell to the Sackler Center’s current exhibition Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work, 1963-1974. This show provides a unique opportunity to see Chicago’s evolution as an artist, and to experience her most famous work, The Dinner Party, in the context of her journey from minimalism to feminism.  It has been exciting to introduce audiences to aspects of Chicago’s work that were not well known on the East Coast, particularly her ephemeral, site-specific outdoor Atmosphere pieces from the 1960s and 70s. In addition to showing historic photographs of this series, on April 26, 2014, we were thrilled to welcome nearly ten thousand people to Prospect Park’s Long Meadow to experience a new Atmosphere work. A Butterfly for Brooklyn, which expanded on Chicago’s 1974 A Butterfly for Oakland, featured a 200-foot wide by 180-foot high sparkling, exploding butterfly, Chicago’s largest installationever. This monumental public project and our exhibition were part of a year of activities celebrating Chicago’s seventy-fifth birthday.
While Chicago in L.A. closes on September 28, the section devoted to her groundbreaking teaching and institution-building projects, Judy Chicago’s Feminist Pedagogy and Alternative Spaces, will remain on view in the Herstory Gallery through November 16. Up next in the main galleries, Judith Scott – Bound and Unbound opens October 24! 

Posted by Saisha M. Grayson
ZoomInfo
The dip in temperature means it’s almost time to say farewell to the Sackler Center’s current exhibition Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work, 1963-1974. This show provides a unique opportunity to see Chicago’s evolution as an artist, and to experience her most famous work, The Dinner Party, in the context of her journey from minimalism to feminism.  It has been exciting to introduce audiences to aspects of Chicago’s work that were not well known on the East Coast, particularly her ephemeral, site-specific outdoor Atmosphere pieces from the 1960s and 70s. In addition to showing historic photographs of this series, on April 26, 2014, we were thrilled to welcome nearly ten thousand people to Prospect Park’s Long Meadow to experience a new Atmosphere work. A Butterfly for Brooklyn, which expanded on Chicago’s 1974 A Butterfly for Oakland, featured a 200-foot wide by 180-foot high sparkling, exploding butterfly, Chicago’s largest installationever. This monumental public project and our exhibition were part of a year of activities celebrating Chicago’s seventy-fifth birthday.
While Chicago in L.A. closes on September 28, the section devoted to her groundbreaking teaching and institution-building projects, Judy Chicago’s Feminist Pedagogy and Alternative Spaces, will remain on view in the Herstory Gallery through November 16. Up next in the main galleries, Judith Scott – Bound and Unbound opens October 24! 

Posted by Saisha M. Grayson
ZoomInfo
The dip in temperature means it’s almost time to say farewell to the Sackler Center’s current exhibition Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work, 1963-1974. This show provides a unique opportunity to see Chicago’s evolution as an artist, and to experience her most famous work, The Dinner Party, in the context of her journey from minimalism to feminism.  It has been exciting to introduce audiences to aspects of Chicago’s work that were not well known on the East Coast, particularly her ephemeral, site-specific outdoor Atmosphere pieces from the 1960s and 70s. In addition to showing historic photographs of this series, on April 26, 2014, we were thrilled to welcome nearly ten thousand people to Prospect Park’s Long Meadow to experience a new Atmosphere work. A Butterfly for Brooklyn, which expanded on Chicago’s 1974 A Butterfly for Oakland, featured a 200-foot wide by 180-foot high sparkling, exploding butterfly, Chicago’s largest installationever. This monumental public project and our exhibition were part of a year of activities celebrating Chicago’s seventy-fifth birthday.
While Chicago in L.A. closes on September 28, the section devoted to her groundbreaking teaching and institution-building projects, Judy Chicago’s Feminist Pedagogy and Alternative Spaces, will remain on view in the Herstory Gallery through November 16. Up next in the main galleries, Judith Scott – Bound and Unbound opens October 24! 

Posted by Saisha M. Grayson
ZoomInfo

The dip in temperature means it’s almost time to say farewell to the Sackler Center’s current exhibition Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work, 1963-1974. This show provides a unique opportunity to see Chicago’s evolution as an artist, and to experience her most famous work, The Dinner Party, in the context of her journey from minimalism to feminism.  It has been exciting to introduce audiences to aspects of Chicago’s work that were not well known on the East Coast, particularly her ephemeral, site-specific outdoor Atmosphere pieces from the 1960s and 70s. In addition to showing historic photographs of this series, on April 26, 2014, we were thrilled to welcome nearly ten thousand people to Prospect Park’s Long Meadow to experience a new Atmosphere work. A Butterfly for Brooklyn, which expanded on Chicago’s 1974 A Butterfly for Oakland, featured a 200-foot wide by 180-foot high sparkling, exploding butterfly, Chicago’s largest installationever. This monumental public project and our exhibition were part of a year of activities celebrating Chicago’s seventy-fifth birthday.

While Chicago in L.A. closes on September 28, the section devoted to her groundbreaking teaching and institution-building projects, Judy Chicago’s Feminist Pedagogy and Alternative Spaces, will remain on view in the Herstory Gallery through November 16. Up next in the main galleries, Judith Scott – Bound and Unbound opens October 24! 

Posted by Saisha M. Grayson

Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo

Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler

This summer the museum’s Gallery Studio Program launched an innovative class for kids ages 11-13 called Forward Thinking: 3D Printing, generously funded by Deutsche Bank. Students were selected to present at World Maker Faire, a massive celebration of technologists and makers hosted at the New York Hall of Science. 
Six children represented the class on the Education Stage. They engaged with audience members and described their thoughts and memories about museum artworks, individual and collaborative projects, and what it was like to develop a digital skill set through creative art challenges.
In case you missed it, you can view the presentation here!


Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
This summer the museum’s Gallery Studio Program launched an innovative class for kids ages 11-13 called Forward Thinking: 3D Printing, generously funded by Deutsche Bank. Students were selected to present at World Maker Faire, a massive celebration of technologists and makers hosted at the New York Hall of Science. 
Six children represented the class on the Education Stage. They engaged with audience members and described their thoughts and memories about museum artworks, individual and collaborative projects, and what it was like to develop a digital skill set through creative art challenges.
In case you missed it, you can view the presentation here!


Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
This summer the museum’s Gallery Studio Program launched an innovative class for kids ages 11-13 called Forward Thinking: 3D Printing, generously funded by Deutsche Bank. Students were selected to present at World Maker Faire, a massive celebration of technologists and makers hosted at the New York Hall of Science. 
Six children represented the class on the Education Stage. They engaged with audience members and described their thoughts and memories about museum artworks, individual and collaborative projects, and what it was like to develop a digital skill set through creative art challenges.
In case you missed it, you can view the presentation here!


Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
This summer the museum’s Gallery Studio Program launched an innovative class for kids ages 11-13 called Forward Thinking: 3D Printing, generously funded by Deutsche Bank. Students were selected to present at World Maker Faire, a massive celebration of technologists and makers hosted at the New York Hall of Science. 
Six children represented the class on the Education Stage. They engaged with audience members and described their thoughts and memories about museum artworks, individual and collaborative projects, and what it was like to develop a digital skill set through creative art challenges.
In case you missed it, you can view the presentation here!


Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo

This summer the museum’s Gallery Studio Program launched an innovative class for kids ages 11-13 called Forward Thinking: 3D Printing, generously funded by Deutsche Bank. Students were selected to present at World Maker Faire, a massive celebration of technologists and makers hosted at the New York Hall of Science.

Six children represented the class on the Education Stage. They engaged with audience members and described their thoughts and memories about museum artworks, individual and collaborative projects, and what it was like to develop a digital skill set through creative art challenges.

In case you missed it, you can view the presentation here!

Posted by Ana Fernandez

We are thrilled to be presenting Power Shift: Becoming an Artist Entrepreneur again this Fall. This will be our first workshop in a series of three. This fall’s sessions will focus on Branding, Building, and Launching your creative business. Janice Bond communications strategist, cultural producer, artist and founder of SAVANT | SAVANT will join us to present her workshop entitled YOUr Art, YOUr Brand, YOUr Business, YOUr Being. We were able to touch base will Janice earlier this week and she is thrilled to be partnering with us to present this workshop. Check out what she had to say:

"The first Power Shift dialogue is this Thursday, and only one word can truly describe my feelings about this… AMPED! I’m really looking forward to this skillshare — it is so important for arts entrepreneurs at any level to think and focus more closely on their brand equity and overall trajectory.

The global-local creative economy is a quite dynamic space with many layers. We will discuss positioning and authenticity, developing successful collaborations and teams, laying the foundation for your overall business strategy and more. Who said living life artfully had to be a lifelong economic challenge or personal compromise? Rise.”

Posted by Alicia Boone

Our current exhibition, Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe tells a beautiful story about high heels and the high heel wearers who have sashayed, suffered, and shined through the decades. There is no denying that the high heel is a provocative accessory that alludes to images of power, sex, and artistic expression. Sometimes seen as a fetish object and other times regarded as a lethal weapon, high heels have a fascinating and varied history!
Here in the Museum’s Libraries and Archives Special Collections we have unearthed our own #killerheels treasure from a rare book by T. Watson Greig showing sixty-three whimsical illustrations of ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century. You can view and download all sixty-three digitized images from Ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century: with sixty-three illustrations by visiting our online catalog.
If you like what you see, you can look at historical shoes from our library’s collection all year long with this 2015 compact easel desk calendar!

Posted by Kim Loconto
ZoomInfo
Our current exhibition, Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe tells a beautiful story about high heels and the high heel wearers who have sashayed, suffered, and shined through the decades. There is no denying that the high heel is a provocative accessory that alludes to images of power, sex, and artistic expression. Sometimes seen as a fetish object and other times regarded as a lethal weapon, high heels have a fascinating and varied history!
Here in the Museum’s Libraries and Archives Special Collections we have unearthed our own #killerheels treasure from a rare book by T. Watson Greig showing sixty-three whimsical illustrations of ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century. You can view and download all sixty-three digitized images from Ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century: with sixty-three illustrations by visiting our online catalog.
If you like what you see, you can look at historical shoes from our library’s collection all year long with this 2015 compact easel desk calendar!

Posted by Kim Loconto
ZoomInfo
Our current exhibition, Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe tells a beautiful story about high heels and the high heel wearers who have sashayed, suffered, and shined through the decades. There is no denying that the high heel is a provocative accessory that alludes to images of power, sex, and artistic expression. Sometimes seen as a fetish object and other times regarded as a lethal weapon, high heels have a fascinating and varied history!
Here in the Museum’s Libraries and Archives Special Collections we have unearthed our own #killerheels treasure from a rare book by T. Watson Greig showing sixty-three whimsical illustrations of ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century. You can view and download all sixty-three digitized images from Ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century: with sixty-three illustrations by visiting our online catalog.
If you like what you see, you can look at historical shoes from our library’s collection all year long with this 2015 compact easel desk calendar!

Posted by Kim Loconto
ZoomInfo

Our current exhibition, Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe tells a beautiful story about high heels and the high heel wearers who have sashayed, suffered, and shined through the decades. There is no denying that the high heel is a provocative accessory that alludes to images of power, sex, and artistic expression. Sometimes seen as a fetish object and other times regarded as a lethal weapon, high heels have a fascinating and varied history!

Here in the Museum’s Libraries and Archives Special Collections we have unearthed our own #killerheels treasure from a rare book by T. Watson Greig showing sixty-three whimsical illustrations of ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century. You can view and download all sixty-three digitized images from Ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century: with sixty-three illustrations by visiting our online catalog.

If you like what you see, you can look at historical shoes from our library’s collection all year long with this 2015 compact easel desk calendar!

Posted by Kim Loconto

A major highlight of the museum’s recent trip to Côte d’Ivoire was having the opportunity to meet master caster Bema Coulibably at his workshop in Dikodougou. Coulibaly learned the art of copper-alloy casting from his father, Songi Soro. Songi Soro was an accomplished artist in his own right who also served as research assistant to a prominent Africanist art historian. We know much about metal casting because of Bema and his family!
Copper-alloy casting employs principles of the lost-wax method where an assemblage of an original wax carving and a baked clay shell overlay are fired at low heat to create a mold for liquid metal. During our visit, Coulibaly was molding with beeswax, creating a mask with impressive, finely-sculpted facial details.
In addition to masks sold for export markets, Coulibaly and other casters throughout northern Côte d’Ivoire cast bracelets and other insignia for diviners, specialists who are consulted throughout the region to solve problems. The museum’s collection has an array of divination-related bracelets, including examples that feature unique imagery. This bracelet, for example, has exquisitely subtle geometric decorations incised in relief. Explore our open collections database for copper-alloy bracelets and divination instruments to see more!

Posted by Roger Arnold
ZoomInfo
A major highlight of the museum’s recent trip to Côte d’Ivoire was having the opportunity to meet master caster Bema Coulibably at his workshop in Dikodougou. Coulibaly learned the art of copper-alloy casting from his father, Songi Soro. Songi Soro was an accomplished artist in his own right who also served as research assistant to a prominent Africanist art historian. We know much about metal casting because of Bema and his family!
Copper-alloy casting employs principles of the lost-wax method where an assemblage of an original wax carving and a baked clay shell overlay are fired at low heat to create a mold for liquid metal. During our visit, Coulibaly was molding with beeswax, creating a mask with impressive, finely-sculpted facial details.
In addition to masks sold for export markets, Coulibaly and other casters throughout northern Côte d’Ivoire cast bracelets and other insignia for diviners, specialists who are consulted throughout the region to solve problems. The museum’s collection has an array of divination-related bracelets, including examples that feature unique imagery. This bracelet, for example, has exquisitely subtle geometric decorations incised in relief. Explore our open collections database for copper-alloy bracelets and divination instruments to see more!

Posted by Roger Arnold
ZoomInfo

A major highlight of the museum’s recent trip to Côte d’Ivoire was having the opportunity to meet master caster Bema Coulibably at his workshop in Dikodougou. Coulibaly learned the art of copper-alloy casting from his father, Songi Soro. Songi Soro was an accomplished artist in his own right who also served as research assistant to a prominent Africanist art historian. We know much about metal casting because of Bema and his family!

Copper-alloy casting employs principles of the lost-wax method where an assemblage of an original wax carving and a baked clay shell overlay are fired at low heat to create a mold for liquid metal. During our visit, Coulibaly was molding with beeswax, creating a mask with impressive, finely-sculpted facial details.

In addition to masks sold for export markets, Coulibaly and other casters throughout northern Côte d’Ivoire cast bracelets and other insignia for diviners, specialists who are consulted throughout the region to solve problems. The museum’s collection has an array of divination-related bracelets, including examples that feature unique imagery. This bracelet, for example, has exquisitely subtle geometric decorations incised in relief. Explore our open collections database for copper-alloy bracelets and divination instruments to see more!

Posted by Roger Arnold

Students from the Gallery Studio class Forward Thinking: 3D Printing have been accepted as presenters at World Maker Faire! Work from this class will also be on view at the upcoming Gallery Studio Program Exhibition in the Brooklyn Museum.
By engaging with both new and traditional media, students have touched on powerful ideas in contemporary art such as the significance of process, juxtaposition, appropriation, and community. With each class, we worked towards an understanding of the implications of democratizing creative content. The kids were particularly interested in artistic discipline and readily voiced their insights as they unraveled concepts. Students have touched on ideas of copying and originality, and whether artwork needs to evidence the artists’ hand. 
Through gallery activities and rich conversation, students have contrasted the differences between looking closely at sculpture through drawing and through a 3D scan. Students created a final collaborative work inspired by Gerrit Rietveld’s Doll’s House, which was created by the designer to give hope to two children during the post-war era. To explore the ideas in this work, students re-imagined our classroom, Studio 1, as their creative kingdom. Students collaborated on a model and used their 3D artwork to modify the space.

This class was part of the Museum’s Gallery/Studio Program, and was generously funded by Deutsche Bank.

 Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
Students from the Gallery Studio class Forward Thinking: 3D Printing have been accepted as presenters at World Maker Faire! Work from this class will also be on view at the upcoming Gallery Studio Program Exhibition in the Brooklyn Museum.
By engaging with both new and traditional media, students have touched on powerful ideas in contemporary art such as the significance of process, juxtaposition, appropriation, and community. With each class, we worked towards an understanding of the implications of democratizing creative content. The kids were particularly interested in artistic discipline and readily voiced their insights as they unraveled concepts. Students have touched on ideas of copying and originality, and whether artwork needs to evidence the artists’ hand. 
Through gallery activities and rich conversation, students have contrasted the differences between looking closely at sculpture through drawing and through a 3D scan. Students created a final collaborative work inspired by Gerrit Rietveld’s Doll’s House, which was created by the designer to give hope to two children during the post-war era. To explore the ideas in this work, students re-imagined our classroom, Studio 1, as their creative kingdom. Students collaborated on a model and used their 3D artwork to modify the space.

This class was part of the Museum’s Gallery/Studio Program, and was generously funded by Deutsche Bank.

 Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
Students from the Gallery Studio class Forward Thinking: 3D Printing have been accepted as presenters at World Maker Faire! Work from this class will also be on view at the upcoming Gallery Studio Program Exhibition in the Brooklyn Museum.
By engaging with both new and traditional media, students have touched on powerful ideas in contemporary art such as the significance of process, juxtaposition, appropriation, and community. With each class, we worked towards an understanding of the implications of democratizing creative content. The kids were particularly interested in artistic discipline and readily voiced their insights as they unraveled concepts. Students have touched on ideas of copying and originality, and whether artwork needs to evidence the artists’ hand. 
Through gallery activities and rich conversation, students have contrasted the differences between looking closely at sculpture through drawing and through a 3D scan. Students created a final collaborative work inspired by Gerrit Rietveld’s Doll’s House, which was created by the designer to give hope to two children during the post-war era. To explore the ideas in this work, students re-imagined our classroom, Studio 1, as their creative kingdom. Students collaborated on a model and used their 3D artwork to modify the space.

This class was part of the Museum’s Gallery/Studio Program, and was generously funded by Deutsche Bank.

 Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
Students from the Gallery Studio class Forward Thinking: 3D Printing have been accepted as presenters at World Maker Faire! Work from this class will also be on view at the upcoming Gallery Studio Program Exhibition in the Brooklyn Museum.
By engaging with both new and traditional media, students have touched on powerful ideas in contemporary art such as the significance of process, juxtaposition, appropriation, and community. With each class, we worked towards an understanding of the implications of democratizing creative content. The kids were particularly interested in artistic discipline and readily voiced their insights as they unraveled concepts. Students have touched on ideas of copying and originality, and whether artwork needs to evidence the artists’ hand. 
Through gallery activities and rich conversation, students have contrasted the differences between looking closely at sculpture through drawing and through a 3D scan. Students created a final collaborative work inspired by Gerrit Rietveld’s Doll’s House, which was created by the designer to give hope to two children during the post-war era. To explore the ideas in this work, students re-imagined our classroom, Studio 1, as their creative kingdom. Students collaborated on a model and used their 3D artwork to modify the space.

This class was part of the Museum’s Gallery/Studio Program, and was generously funded by Deutsche Bank.

 Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo

Students from the Gallery Studio class Forward Thinking: 3D Printing have been accepted as presenters at World Maker Faire! Work from this class will also be on view at the upcoming Gallery Studio Program Exhibition in the Brooklyn Museum.

By engaging with both new and traditional media, students have touched on powerful ideas in contemporary art such as the significance of process, juxtaposition, appropriation, and community. With each class, we worked towards an understanding of the implications of democratizing creative content. The kids were particularly interested in artistic discipline and readily voiced their insights as they unraveled concepts. Students have touched on ideas of copying and originality, and whether artwork needs to evidence the artists’ hand.

Through gallery activities and rich conversation, students have contrasted the differences between looking closely at sculpture through drawing and through a 3D scan. Students created a final collaborative work inspired by Gerrit Rietveld’s Doll’s House, which was created by the designer to give hope to two children during the post-war era. To explore the ideas in this work, students re-imagined our classroom, Studio 1, as their creative kingdom. Students collaborated on a model and used their 3D artwork to modify the space.

This class was part of the Museum’s Gallery/Studio Program, and was generously funded by Deutsche Bank.

 Posted by Ana Fernandez

For the past several months, the Brooklyn Museum has had a shoe closet to rival that of the most dedicated fashionista. These amazing shoes, which range from a pair of velvet chopines worn by a wealthy woman in Renaissance Venice, to the towering high heel bootie designed by United Nude for Lady Gaga, have now gone on view in the Killer Heels exhibition. Run, don’t walk, to see this array of strange, beautiful, and sometimes disturbing elevated footwear from several centuries and cultures. Unless you’re wearing your own killer heels, of course, in which case you should definitely walk!

Posted by Lisa Small
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For the past several months, the Brooklyn Museum has had a shoe closet to rival that of the most dedicated fashionista. These amazing shoes, which range from a pair of velvet chopines worn by a wealthy woman in Renaissance Venice, to the towering high heel bootie designed by United Nude for Lady Gaga, have now gone on view in the Killer Heels exhibition. Run, don’t walk, to see this array of strange, beautiful, and sometimes disturbing elevated footwear from several centuries and cultures. Unless you’re wearing your own killer heels, of course, in which case you should definitely walk!

Posted by Lisa Small
ZoomInfo

For the past several months, the Brooklyn Museum has had a shoe closet to rival that of the most dedicated fashionista. These amazing shoes, which range from a pair of velvet chopines worn by a wealthy woman in Renaissance Venice, to the towering high heel bootie designed by United Nude for Lady Gaga, have now gone on view in the Killer Heels exhibition. Run, don’t walk, to see this array of strange, beautiful, and sometimes disturbing elevated footwear from several centuries and cultures. Unless you’re wearing your own killer heels, of course, in which case you should definitely walk!

Posted by Lisa Small

In a few hours the museum will come alive with a vibrant group of artists from the Brooklyn Emerging Artists and Theatre Festival! This will be our second time collaborating with this budding Brooklyn organization. Tonight, you can come to the  museum and choose your own adventure and explore the museum with a map with all of the acts and locations marked. Come early and be a part of creating a #TweetDance where professional dancers of all styles turn tweets and short prompts from audience members near and far into minute-long improvised dance performances on the spot. The BEAT Opening Night will feature performers such as Aja Monet, Bed-Stuy Veterans, Chanel Kennebrew, Dancewave, UnderOneDances and many more powerful performers!

Posted by Alicia Boone
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In a few hours the museum will come alive with a vibrant group of artists from the Brooklyn Emerging Artists and Theatre Festival! This will be our second time collaborating with this budding Brooklyn organization. Tonight, you can come to the  museum and choose your own adventure and explore the museum with a map with all of the acts and locations marked. Come early and be a part of creating a #TweetDance where professional dancers of all styles turn tweets and short prompts from audience members near and far into minute-long improvised dance performances on the spot. The BEAT Opening Night will feature performers such as Aja Monet, Bed-Stuy Veterans, Chanel Kennebrew, Dancewave, UnderOneDances and many more powerful performers!

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo
In a few hours the museum will come alive with a vibrant group of artists from the Brooklyn Emerging Artists and Theatre Festival! This will be our second time collaborating with this budding Brooklyn organization. Tonight, you can come to the  museum and choose your own adventure and explore the museum with a map with all of the acts and locations marked. Come early and be a part of creating a #TweetDance where professional dancers of all styles turn tweets and short prompts from audience members near and far into minute-long improvised dance performances on the spot. The BEAT Opening Night will feature performers such as Aja Monet, Bed-Stuy Veterans, Chanel Kennebrew, Dancewave, UnderOneDances and many more powerful performers!

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo
In a few hours the museum will come alive with a vibrant group of artists from the Brooklyn Emerging Artists and Theatre Festival! This will be our second time collaborating with this budding Brooklyn organization. Tonight, you can come to the  museum and choose your own adventure and explore the museum with a map with all of the acts and locations marked. Come early and be a part of creating a #TweetDance where professional dancers of all styles turn tweets and short prompts from audience members near and far into minute-long improvised dance performances on the spot. The BEAT Opening Night will feature performers such as Aja Monet, Bed-Stuy Veterans, Chanel Kennebrew, Dancewave, UnderOneDances and many more powerful performers!

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo

In a few hours the museum will come alive with a vibrant group of artists from the Brooklyn Emerging Artists and Theatre Festival! This will be our second time collaborating with this budding Brooklyn organization. Tonight, you can come to the  museum and choose your own adventure and explore the museum with a map with all of the acts and locations marked. Come early and be a part of creating a #TweetDance where professional dancers of all styles turn tweets and short prompts from audience members near and far into minute-long improvised dance performances on the spot. The BEAT Opening Night will feature performers such as Aja Monet, Bed-Stuy Veterans, Chanel Kennebrew, Dancewave, UnderOneDances and many more powerful performers!

Posted by Alicia Boone

You may have already gathered from following the museum’s Twitter (and perhaps from following #CIVTrip2014) that the African art office recently returned from a 3-week trip to Côte d’Ivoire in West Africa. Joined by colleagues from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Africa Center, as well as Roger Arnold, curatorial assistant, our small research group was led by scholar Jerry Vogel across the country for a short, in-depth exposure to the major art producing groups in Côte d’Ivoire. We began by exploring the contemporary art scene in Abidjan and continued the trip with extended visits to different cultural and geographic regions across the country. We had the opportunity to meet with sculptors, weavers, and bronze-casters, to witness dynamic masquerade performances, and to visit cities and villages with a fascinating range of historical architecture.
Côte d’Ivoire is the point of origin for a range of works in the museum’s collection. In four posts over the course of the next few weeks, Roger and I will share some of the ways in which our Côte d’Ivoire trip revealed surprising and exciting connections to works in the collection. In the meantime, you can find a selection of images, video, and observations collected from the trip on Twitter.

Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo
You may have already gathered from following the museum’s Twitter (and perhaps from following #CIVTrip2014) that the African art office recently returned from a 3-week trip to Côte d’Ivoire in West Africa. Joined by colleagues from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Africa Center, as well as Roger Arnold, curatorial assistant, our small research group was led by scholar Jerry Vogel across the country for a short, in-depth exposure to the major art producing groups in Côte d’Ivoire. We began by exploring the contemporary art scene in Abidjan and continued the trip with extended visits to different cultural and geographic regions across the country. We had the opportunity to meet with sculptors, weavers, and bronze-casters, to witness dynamic masquerade performances, and to visit cities and villages with a fascinating range of historical architecture.
Côte d’Ivoire is the point of origin for a range of works in the museum’s collection. In four posts over the course of the next few weeks, Roger and I will share some of the ways in which our Côte d’Ivoire trip revealed surprising and exciting connections to works in the collection. In the meantime, you can find a selection of images, video, and observations collected from the trip on Twitter.

Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo
You may have already gathered from following the museum’s Twitter (and perhaps from following #CIVTrip2014) that the African art office recently returned from a 3-week trip to Côte d’Ivoire in West Africa. Joined by colleagues from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Africa Center, as well as Roger Arnold, curatorial assistant, our small research group was led by scholar Jerry Vogel across the country for a short, in-depth exposure to the major art producing groups in Côte d’Ivoire. We began by exploring the contemporary art scene in Abidjan and continued the trip with extended visits to different cultural and geographic regions across the country. We had the opportunity to meet with sculptors, weavers, and bronze-casters, to witness dynamic masquerade performances, and to visit cities and villages with a fascinating range of historical architecture.
Côte d’Ivoire is the point of origin for a range of works in the museum’s collection. In four posts over the course of the next few weeks, Roger and I will share some of the ways in which our Côte d’Ivoire trip revealed surprising and exciting connections to works in the collection. In the meantime, you can find a selection of images, video, and observations collected from the trip on Twitter.

Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo
You may have already gathered from following the museum’s Twitter (and perhaps from following #CIVTrip2014) that the African art office recently returned from a 3-week trip to Côte d’Ivoire in West Africa. Joined by colleagues from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Africa Center, as well as Roger Arnold, curatorial assistant, our small research group was led by scholar Jerry Vogel across the country for a short, in-depth exposure to the major art producing groups in Côte d’Ivoire. We began by exploring the contemporary art scene in Abidjan and continued the trip with extended visits to different cultural and geographic regions across the country. We had the opportunity to meet with sculptors, weavers, and bronze-casters, to witness dynamic masquerade performances, and to visit cities and villages with a fascinating range of historical architecture.
Côte d’Ivoire is the point of origin for a range of works in the museum’s collection. In four posts over the course of the next few weeks, Roger and I will share some of the ways in which our Côte d’Ivoire trip revealed surprising and exciting connections to works in the collection. In the meantime, you can find a selection of images, video, and observations collected from the trip on Twitter.

Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo

You may have already gathered from following the museum’s Twitter (and perhaps from following #CIVTrip2014) that the African art office recently returned from a 3-week trip to Côte d’Ivoire in West Africa. Joined by colleagues from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Africa Center, as well as Roger Arnold, curatorial assistant, our small research group was led by scholar Jerry Vogel across the country for a short, in-depth exposure to the major art producing groups in Côte d’Ivoire. We began by exploring the contemporary art scene in Abidjan and continued the trip with extended visits to different cultural and geographic regions across the country. We had the opportunity to meet with sculptors, weavers, and bronze-casters, to witness dynamic masquerade performances, and to visit cities and villages with a fascinating range of historical architecture.

Côte d’Ivoire is the point of origin for a range of works in the museum’s collection. In four posts over the course of the next few weeks, Roger and I will share some of the ways in which our Côte d’Ivoire trip revealed surprising and exciting connections to works in the collection. In the meantime, you can find a selection of images, video, and observations collected from the trip on Twitter.

Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle

Artist David Horvitz dropped off Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne) to the Brooklyn Museum Library today! We are delighted to be the recipient of Horvitz’s Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne): an editioned group show in the form of archival boxes filled with works from two dozen international artists. We now have one of these “valises” which have been mailed as unsolicited donations to 31 museum libraries around the world. Brooklyn is one of them! Timely as we will be showcasing Horvitz’s work in our upcoming exhibition #CrossingBrooklyn.

Posted by Kim Loconto

 
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Artist David Horvitz dropped off Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne) to the Brooklyn Museum Library today! We are delighted to be the recipient of Horvitz’s Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne): an editioned group show in the form of archival boxes filled with works from two dozen international artists. We now have one of these “valises” which have been mailed as unsolicited donations to 31 museum libraries around the world. Brooklyn is one of them! Timely as we will be showcasing Horvitz’s work in our upcoming exhibition #CrossingBrooklyn.

Posted by Kim Loconto

 
ZoomInfo
Artist David Horvitz dropped off Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne) to the Brooklyn Museum Library today! We are delighted to be the recipient of Horvitz’s Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne): an editioned group show in the form of archival boxes filled with works from two dozen international artists. We now have one of these “valises” which have been mailed as unsolicited donations to 31 museum libraries around the world. Brooklyn is one of them! Timely as we will be showcasing Horvitz’s work in our upcoming exhibition #CrossingBrooklyn.

Posted by Kim Loconto

 
ZoomInfo
Artist David Horvitz dropped off Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne) to the Brooklyn Museum Library today! We are delighted to be the recipient of Horvitz’s Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne): an editioned group show in the form of archival boxes filled with works from two dozen international artists. We now have one of these “valises” which have been mailed as unsolicited donations to 31 museum libraries around the world. Brooklyn is one of them! Timely as we will be showcasing Horvitz’s work in our upcoming exhibition #CrossingBrooklyn.

Posted by Kim Loconto

 
ZoomInfo

Artist David Horvitz dropped off Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne) to the Brooklyn Museum Library today! We are delighted to be the recipient of Horvitz’s Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne): an editioned group show in the form of archival boxes filled with works from two dozen international artists. We now have one of these “valises” which have been mailed as unsolicited donations to 31 museum libraries around the world. Brooklyn is one of them! Timely as we will be showcasing Horvitz’s work in our upcoming exhibition #CrossingBrooklyn.

Posted by Kim Loconto

 

Forward Thinking: 3D Printing is a new class in which children are using fabrication tools to both learn about art and make art. I feel very lucky to be teaching a group of magical tweens through the Gallery Studio Program. My goal for this class has been to teach 3D scanning, modeling and printing as art-making processes. Class projects are anchored in sculptures at the museum. In order to gain confidence expressing themselves digitally, students have engaged with drawing, clay and painting alongside 3D modeling, scanning and printing. 
In the first few classes kids worked on 3D scanning each others’ heads to 3D print busts of themselves, inspired by Fred Wilson’s ceramic busts of Nefertiti colored in light and dark flesh tones for Gray Area (Brown Version). Students worked through ideas of representation by creating headpieces for their busts that depict their talents and interests, inspired by the Beaded Crown (Ade) of Onijagbo Obasoro Alowolodu. This artifact, which we 3D scanned as a group, is decorated in horses and warriors to show the Yoruba King’s military prowess. Inspired by the core ideas and formal qualities of these works, students created their own original sculptures using 3D printing.
Our 3D printing classes were sponsored by Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation through their Art & Emerging Technology grant program, which advances the usage of interactive technologies in cultural institutions. 

Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
Forward Thinking: 3D Printing is a new class in which children are using fabrication tools to both learn about art and make art. I feel very lucky to be teaching a group of magical tweens through the Gallery Studio Program. My goal for this class has been to teach 3D scanning, modeling and printing as art-making processes. Class projects are anchored in sculptures at the museum. In order to gain confidence expressing themselves digitally, students have engaged with drawing, clay and painting alongside 3D modeling, scanning and printing. 
In the first few classes kids worked on 3D scanning each others’ heads to 3D print busts of themselves, inspired by Fred Wilson’s ceramic busts of Nefertiti colored in light and dark flesh tones for Gray Area (Brown Version). Students worked through ideas of representation by creating headpieces for their busts that depict their talents and interests, inspired by the Beaded Crown (Ade) of Onijagbo Obasoro Alowolodu. This artifact, which we 3D scanned as a group, is decorated in horses and warriors to show the Yoruba King’s military prowess. Inspired by the core ideas and formal qualities of these works, students created their own original sculptures using 3D printing.
Our 3D printing classes were sponsored by Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation through their Art & Emerging Technology grant program, which advances the usage of interactive technologies in cultural institutions. 

Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
Forward Thinking: 3D Printing is a new class in which children are using fabrication tools to both learn about art and make art. I feel very lucky to be teaching a group of magical tweens through the Gallery Studio Program. My goal for this class has been to teach 3D scanning, modeling and printing as art-making processes. Class projects are anchored in sculptures at the museum. In order to gain confidence expressing themselves digitally, students have engaged with drawing, clay and painting alongside 3D modeling, scanning and printing. 
In the first few classes kids worked on 3D scanning each others’ heads to 3D print busts of themselves, inspired by Fred Wilson’s ceramic busts of Nefertiti colored in light and dark flesh tones for Gray Area (Brown Version). Students worked through ideas of representation by creating headpieces for their busts that depict their talents and interests, inspired by the Beaded Crown (Ade) of Onijagbo Obasoro Alowolodu. This artifact, which we 3D scanned as a group, is decorated in horses and warriors to show the Yoruba King’s military prowess. Inspired by the core ideas and formal qualities of these works, students created their own original sculptures using 3D printing.
Our 3D printing classes were sponsored by Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation through their Art & Emerging Technology grant program, which advances the usage of interactive technologies in cultural institutions. 

Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
Forward Thinking: 3D Printing is a new class in which children are using fabrication tools to both learn about art and make art. I feel very lucky to be teaching a group of magical tweens through the Gallery Studio Program. My goal for this class has been to teach 3D scanning, modeling and printing as art-making processes. Class projects are anchored in sculptures at the museum. In order to gain confidence expressing themselves digitally, students have engaged with drawing, clay and painting alongside 3D modeling, scanning and printing. 
In the first few classes kids worked on 3D scanning each others’ heads to 3D print busts of themselves, inspired by Fred Wilson’s ceramic busts of Nefertiti colored in light and dark flesh tones for Gray Area (Brown Version). Students worked through ideas of representation by creating headpieces for their busts that depict their talents and interests, inspired by the Beaded Crown (Ade) of Onijagbo Obasoro Alowolodu. This artifact, which we 3D scanned as a group, is decorated in horses and warriors to show the Yoruba King’s military prowess. Inspired by the core ideas and formal qualities of these works, students created their own original sculptures using 3D printing.
Our 3D printing classes were sponsored by Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation through their Art & Emerging Technology grant program, which advances the usage of interactive technologies in cultural institutions. 

Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo

Forward Thinking: 3D Printing is a new class in which children are using fabrication tools to both learn about art and make art. I feel very lucky to be teaching a group of magical tweens through the Gallery Studio Program. My goal for this class has been to teach 3D scanning, modeling and printing as art-making processes. Class projects are anchored in sculptures at the museum. In order to gain confidence expressing themselves digitally, students have engaged with drawing, clay and painting alongside 3D modeling, scanning and printing.

In the first few classes kids worked on 3D scanning each others’ heads to 3D print busts of themselves, inspired by Fred Wilson’s ceramic busts of Nefertiti colored in light and dark flesh tones for Gray Area (Brown Version). Students worked through ideas of representation by creating headpieces for their busts that depict their talents and interests, inspired by the Beaded Crown (Ade) of Onijagbo Obasoro Alowolodu. This artifact, which we 3D scanned as a group, is decorated in horses and warriors to show the Yoruba King’s military prowess. Inspired by the core ideas and formal qualities of these works, students created their own original sculptures using 3D printing.

Our 3D printing classes were sponsored by Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation through their Art & Emerging Technology grant program, which advances the usage of interactive technologies in cultural institutions. 

Posted by Ana Fernandez

#AiWeiwei once said "a small act is worth a million thoughts” and his show Ai Weiwei: According to What? is no small act. The works featured in the show span more than twenty years of his art and #activism — there is a lot to take in and it is not to be missed. 

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
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#AiWeiwei once said "a small act is worth a million thoughts” and his show Ai Weiwei: According to What? is no small act. The works featured in the show span more than twenty years of his art and #activism — there is a lot to take in and it is not to be missed. 

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
#AiWeiwei once said "a small act is worth a million thoughts” and his show Ai Weiwei: According to What? is no small act. The works featured in the show span more than twenty years of his art and #activism — there is a lot to take in and it is not to be missed. 

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
#AiWeiwei once said "a small act is worth a million thoughts” and his show Ai Weiwei: According to What? is no small act. The works featured in the show span more than twenty years of his art and #activism — there is a lot to take in and it is not to be missed. 

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo

#AiWeiwei once said "a small act is worth a million thoughts” and his show Ai Weiwei: According to What? is no small act. The works featured in the show span more than twenty years of his art and #activism — there is a lot to take in and it is not to be missed. 

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler

There have been a lot of #swoonstreetart pieces spotted around Brooklyn recently. Here’s brooklynstreetart found in Red Hook. Much like her art that lives outdoors, her installation will not last forever — ”Swoon: Submerged Motherlands" ends Aug 24th.

brooklynstreetart:

Swoon RED wall in RED HOOK with two weeks left of “Submerged Motherlands” @brooklynmuseum http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/2014/08/05/swoon-across-a-red-corrugated-wall-in-red-hook/#.U-EHjEiWWK8
photo © Jaime Rojo