Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
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Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo

Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler

In the Sackler Center we are making preparations for Judy Chicago’s new pyrotechnic artwork, A Butterfly for Brooklyn, to be presented in Prospect Park’s Long Meadow on April 26th. The new piece reengages a series of works she began in the late 60’s called Atmospheres, which are presented through documentation in our current exhibition Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work 1963-74.

This video documents the piece A Butterfly for Pomona (2012) commissioned by The Getty’s Pacific Standard Time and gives you an idea of the visuals, scale and duration of the new piece. The exciting news is that A Butterfly for Brooklyn will be the most elaborate of her ephemeral environmental works to date.

Posted by Jess Wilcox.

Springtime is upon us and this year’s especially long winter makes us appreciate it even more so. The transition to warmer temperatures usually coincides with brighter colors all around us like pink, purple, peach, coral, and blue.

The Brooklyn Museum’s former Edward C. Blum Design Laboratory in Decorative Arts influenced fashion designers and manufacturers by making costume and textile works available to members for research. As a service to Design Lab members, the department staff produced color direction cards, or swatch samples, twice a year for designers in fashion and home interiors. In the Spring 1965 issue of Color Directions, pictured above, the forecast predicts:

“Pinks of all varieties will be featured in both apparel and home-furnishing market. While some amber tonalities will undoubtedly carry over from Fall 1964, clear pinks and rose reds, 296-311, look fresher. An old favorite, American Beauty, returns in a brighter version, 311.”

Photo: Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Costumes and Textiles: Edward C. Blum Design Laboratory. Swatches: Color Directions, Spring 1965.
Posted by Eunice Liu

A loop after a loop. Hour after hour my madness becomes crochet.” - says #BKArtistsBall artist Olek who covers people, objects and places in bright, cozy knits. Today she will cover our Instagram!

Here’s Olek on a fence in Red Hook, Whateverrrr (image © Jaime Rojo brooklynstreetart).

(Source: brooklynstreetart)

#BKArtistBall artist Nick van Woert is informed by his background in architecture and his fascination with antiquity - he cites Vitruvius, the early Roman architect who was inspired by nature, as a significant influence.
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#BKArtistBall artist Nick van Woert is informed by his background in architecture and his fascination with antiquity - he cites Vitruvius, the early Roman architect who was inspired by nature, as a significant influence.
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#BKArtistBall artist Nick van Woert is informed by his background in architecture and his fascination with antiquity - he cites Vitruvius, the early Roman architect who was inspired by nature, as a significant influence.

(Source: work.fourteensquarefeet.com)

"I’ve played so many video games and watched thousands of movies. It’s hard to know what memories happened to me and which come from other places." - #BKArtistsBall artist Jeremy Couillard on the digital-inspired worlds in his work.
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"I’ve played so many video games and watched thousands of movies. It’s hard to know what memories happened to me and which come from other places." - #BKArtistsBall artist Jeremy Couillard on the digital-inspired worlds in his work.
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"I’ve played so many video games and watched thousands of movies. It’s hard to know what memories happened to me and which come from other places." - #BKArtistsBall artist Jeremy Couillard on the digital-inspired worlds in his work.
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"I’ve played so many video games and watched thousands of movies. It’s hard to know what memories happened to me and which come from other places." - #BKArtistsBall artist Jeremy Couillard on the digital-inspired worlds in his work.

(Source: jeremycouillard.com)

#BKArtistsBall honoree  Kehinde Wiley depicts heroic modern figures in traditional formats. His use of colorful background patterns make specific reference to textiles and decorative patterns of various cultures, from 19th-century Judaica paper cutouts to Martha Stewart’s interior color swatches.

(Source: kehindewiley.com)

This image ­­­­­is taken from our glass negative collection at the Brooklyn Museum which includes images from historic Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, Long Island, Connecticut and New Jersey. This photograph was taken by George Bradford Brainerd in 1879 at the Bay Shore railroad station on Long Island. 

During the 19th century Long Island was mainly a rural area with large amounts of land devoted to agriculture. It wasn’t until the later part of the century that LIRR service quickly expanded east allowing much greater access to the island and into Manhattan. This allowed the population not only on Long Island, but also in Brooklyn and Queens to expand substantially in population and development during the 19th and 20th centuries.

Posted by Tracie Davis

Opening today, Chicago in L.A. surveys the work of Judy Chicago before her iconic feminist work, The Dinner Party. This survey includes approximately sixty paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, and videos, including documentation of performances, spanning 1963 to 1974. An outdoor component of the exhibition, A Butterfly for Brooklyn, will be presented in partnership with the Prospect Park Alliance on Saturday, April 26, at 7:30 p.m.
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Opening today, Chicago in L.A. surveys the work of Judy Chicago before her iconic feminist work, The Dinner PartyThis survey includes approximately sixty paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, and videos, including documentation of performances, spanning 1963 to 1974. An outdoor component of the exhibition, A Butterfly for Brooklyn, will be presented in partnership with the Prospect Park Alliance on Saturday, April 26, at 7:30 p.m.

"I’m always interested in seducing the viewer and then hitting them on the way out, allowing a delayed response to powerfully charged content.” says #BKArtistBall artist Rico GatsonStep into his world today as he takes over our Instagram

“I like making compositions that are awkward and go against what might be considered pleasing,” says #BKArtistsBall artist Ellen Altfest of her highly detailed paintings (repeat, paintings) of both intimate and humble subjects.
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“I like making compositions that are awkward and go against what might be considered pleasing,” says #BKArtistsBall artist Ellen Altfest of her highly detailed paintings (repeat, paintings) of both intimate and humble subjects.
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“I like making compositions that are awkward and go against what might be considered pleasing,” says #BKArtistsBall artist Ellen Altfest of her highly detailed paintings (repeat, paintings) of both intimate and humble subjects.
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“I like making compositions that are awkward and go against what might be considered pleasing,” says #BKArtistsBall artist Ellen Altfest of her highly detailed paintings (repeat, paintings) of both intimate and humble subjects.

Bob Thompson’s Homage to Nina Simone (1965) uses electric colors to celebrate that dynamic songstress of the Civil Rights movement Nina Simone. Fifty years ago today, Simone performed “Mississippi Goddam” at Carnegie Hall for one of the first times. The song was penned as an impassioned response to the Medgar Evers assassination and the Birmingham church bombing.  Simone’s song and other Civil Rights anthems are currently playing in our galleries, serving as a “soundtrack” to accompany Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties.

Thompson’s painting is featured here, hanging in a section of Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties that explores the role of women in the movement.

Posted by Dalila Scruggs