Students from the Gallery Studio class Forward Thinking: 3D Printing have been accepted as presenters at World Maker Faire! Work from this class will also be on view at the upcoming Gallery Studio Program Exhibition in the Brooklyn Museum.
By engaging with both new and traditional media, students have touched on powerful ideas in contemporary art such as the significance of process, juxtaposition, appropriation, and community. With each class, we worked towards an understanding of the implications of democratizing creative content. The kids were particularly interested in artistic discipline and readily voiced their insights as they unraveled concepts. Students have touched on ideas of copying and originality, and whether artwork needs to evidence the artists’ hand. 
Through gallery activities and rich conversation, students have contrasted the differences between looking closely at sculpture through drawing and through a 3D scan. Students created a final collaborative work inspired by Gerrit Rietveld’s Doll’s House, which was created by the designer to give hope to two children during the post-war era. To explore the ideas in this work, students re-imagined our classroom, Studio 1, as their creative kingdom. Students collaborated on a model and used their 3D artwork to modify the space.

This class was part of the Museum’s Gallery/Studio Program, and was generously funded by Deutsche Bank.

 Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
Students from the Gallery Studio class Forward Thinking: 3D Printing have been accepted as presenters at World Maker Faire! Work from this class will also be on view at the upcoming Gallery Studio Program Exhibition in the Brooklyn Museum.
By engaging with both new and traditional media, students have touched on powerful ideas in contemporary art such as the significance of process, juxtaposition, appropriation, and community. With each class, we worked towards an understanding of the implications of democratizing creative content. The kids were particularly interested in artistic discipline and readily voiced their insights as they unraveled concepts. Students have touched on ideas of copying and originality, and whether artwork needs to evidence the artists’ hand. 
Through gallery activities and rich conversation, students have contrasted the differences between looking closely at sculpture through drawing and through a 3D scan. Students created a final collaborative work inspired by Gerrit Rietveld’s Doll’s House, which was created by the designer to give hope to two children during the post-war era. To explore the ideas in this work, students re-imagined our classroom, Studio 1, as their creative kingdom. Students collaborated on a model and used their 3D artwork to modify the space.

This class was part of the Museum’s Gallery/Studio Program, and was generously funded by Deutsche Bank.

 Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo

Students from the Gallery Studio class Forward Thinking: 3D Printing have been accepted as presenters at World Maker Faire! Work from this class will also be on view at the upcoming Gallery Studio Program Exhibition in the Brooklyn Museum.

By engaging with both new and traditional media, students have touched on powerful ideas in contemporary art such as the significance of process, juxtaposition, appropriation, and community. With each class, we worked towards an understanding of the implications of democratizing creative content. The kids were particularly interested in artistic discipline and readily voiced their insights as they unraveled concepts. Students have touched on ideas of copying and originality, and whether artwork needs to evidence the artists’ hand.

Through gallery activities and rich conversation, students have contrasted the differences between looking closely at sculpture through drawing and through a 3D scan. Students created a final collaborative work inspired by Gerrit Rietveld’s Doll’s House, which was created by the designer to give hope to two children during the post-war era. To explore the ideas in this work, students re-imagined our classroom, Studio 1, as their creative kingdom. Students collaborated on a model and used their 3D artwork to modify the space.

This class was part of the Museum’s Gallery/Studio Program, and was generously funded by Deutsche Bank.

 Posted by Ana Fernandez

For the past several months, the Brooklyn Museum has had a shoe closet to rival that of the most dedicated fashionista. These amazing shoes, which range from a pair of velvet chopines worn by a wealthy woman in Renaissance Venice, to the towering high heel bootie designed by United Nude for Lady Gaga, have now gone on view in the Killer Heels exhibition. Run, don’t walk, to see this array of strange, beautiful, and sometimes disturbing elevated footwear from several centuries and cultures. Unless you’re wearing your own killer heels, of course, in which case you should definitely walk!

Posted by Lisa Small
ZoomInfo
For the past several months, the Brooklyn Museum has had a shoe closet to rival that of the most dedicated fashionista. These amazing shoes, which range from a pair of velvet chopines worn by a wealthy woman in Renaissance Venice, to the towering high heel bootie designed by United Nude for Lady Gaga, have now gone on view in the Killer Heels exhibition. Run, don’t walk, to see this array of strange, beautiful, and sometimes disturbing elevated footwear from several centuries and cultures. Unless you’re wearing your own killer heels, of course, in which case you should definitely walk!

Posted by Lisa Small
ZoomInfo

For the past several months, the Brooklyn Museum has had a shoe closet to rival that of the most dedicated fashionista. These amazing shoes, which range from a pair of velvet chopines worn by a wealthy woman in Renaissance Venice, to the towering high heel bootie designed by United Nude for Lady Gaga, have now gone on view in the Killer Heels exhibition. Run, don’t walk, to see this array of strange, beautiful, and sometimes disturbing elevated footwear from several centuries and cultures. Unless you’re wearing your own killer heels, of course, in which case you should definitely walk!

Posted by Lisa Small

In a few hours the museum will come alive with a vibrant group of artists from the Brooklyn Emerging Artists and Theatre Festival! This will be our second time collaborating with this budding Brooklyn organization. Tonight, you can come to the  museum and choose your own adventure and explore the museum with a map with all of the acts and locations marked. Come early and be a part of creating a #TweetDance where professional dancers of all styles turn tweets and short prompts from audience members near and far into minute-long improvised dance performances on the spot. The BEAT Opening Night will feature performers such as Aja Monet, Bed-Stuy Veterans, Chanel Kennebrew, Dancewave, UnderOneDances and many more powerful performers!

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo
In a few hours the museum will come alive with a vibrant group of artists from the Brooklyn Emerging Artists and Theatre Festival! This will be our second time collaborating with this budding Brooklyn organization. Tonight, you can come to the  museum and choose your own adventure and explore the museum with a map with all of the acts and locations marked. Come early and be a part of creating a #TweetDance where professional dancers of all styles turn tweets and short prompts from audience members near and far into minute-long improvised dance performances on the spot. The BEAT Opening Night will feature performers such as Aja Monet, Bed-Stuy Veterans, Chanel Kennebrew, Dancewave, UnderOneDances and many more powerful performers!

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo
In a few hours the museum will come alive with a vibrant group of artists from the Brooklyn Emerging Artists and Theatre Festival! This will be our second time collaborating with this budding Brooklyn organization. Tonight, you can come to the  museum and choose your own adventure and explore the museum with a map with all of the acts and locations marked. Come early and be a part of creating a #TweetDance where professional dancers of all styles turn tweets and short prompts from audience members near and far into minute-long improvised dance performances on the spot. The BEAT Opening Night will feature performers such as Aja Monet, Bed-Stuy Veterans, Chanel Kennebrew, Dancewave, UnderOneDances and many more powerful performers!

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo
In a few hours the museum will come alive with a vibrant group of artists from the Brooklyn Emerging Artists and Theatre Festival! This will be our second time collaborating with this budding Brooklyn organization. Tonight, you can come to the  museum and choose your own adventure and explore the museum with a map with all of the acts and locations marked. Come early and be a part of creating a #TweetDance where professional dancers of all styles turn tweets and short prompts from audience members near and far into minute-long improvised dance performances on the spot. The BEAT Opening Night will feature performers such as Aja Monet, Bed-Stuy Veterans, Chanel Kennebrew, Dancewave, UnderOneDances and many more powerful performers!

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo

In a few hours the museum will come alive with a vibrant group of artists from the Brooklyn Emerging Artists and Theatre Festival! This will be our second time collaborating with this budding Brooklyn organization. Tonight, you can come to the  museum and choose your own adventure and explore the museum with a map with all of the acts and locations marked. Come early and be a part of creating a #TweetDance where professional dancers of all styles turn tweets and short prompts from audience members near and far into minute-long improvised dance performances on the spot. The BEAT Opening Night will feature performers such as Aja Monet, Bed-Stuy Veterans, Chanel Kennebrew, Dancewave, UnderOneDances and many more powerful performers!

Posted by Alicia Boone

You may have already gathered from following the museum’s Twitter (and perhaps from following #CIVTrip2014) that the African art office recently returned from a 3-week trip to Côte d’Ivoire in West Africa. Joined by colleagues from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Africa Center, as well as Roger Arnold, curatorial assistant, our small research group was led by scholar Jerry Vogel across the country for a short, in-depth exposure to the major art producing groups in Côte d’Ivoire. We began by exploring the contemporary art scene in Abidjan and continued the trip with extended visits to different cultural and geographic regions across the country. We had the opportunity to meet with sculptors, weavers, and bronze-casters, to witness dynamic masquerade performances, and to visit cities and villages with a fascinating range of historical architecture.
Côte d’Ivoire is the point of origin for a range of works in the museum’s collection. In four posts over the course of the next few weeks, Roger and I will share some of the ways in which our Côte d’Ivoire trip revealed surprising and exciting connections to works in the collection. In the meantime, you can find a selection of images, video, and observations collected from the trip on Twitter.

Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo
You may have already gathered from following the museum’s Twitter (and perhaps from following #CIVTrip2014) that the African art office recently returned from a 3-week trip to Côte d’Ivoire in West Africa. Joined by colleagues from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Africa Center, as well as Roger Arnold, curatorial assistant, our small research group was led by scholar Jerry Vogel across the country for a short, in-depth exposure to the major art producing groups in Côte d’Ivoire. We began by exploring the contemporary art scene in Abidjan and continued the trip with extended visits to different cultural and geographic regions across the country. We had the opportunity to meet with sculptors, weavers, and bronze-casters, to witness dynamic masquerade performances, and to visit cities and villages with a fascinating range of historical architecture.
Côte d’Ivoire is the point of origin for a range of works in the museum’s collection. In four posts over the course of the next few weeks, Roger and I will share some of the ways in which our Côte d’Ivoire trip revealed surprising and exciting connections to works in the collection. In the meantime, you can find a selection of images, video, and observations collected from the trip on Twitter.

Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo
You may have already gathered from following the museum’s Twitter (and perhaps from following #CIVTrip2014) that the African art office recently returned from a 3-week trip to Côte d’Ivoire in West Africa. Joined by colleagues from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Africa Center, as well as Roger Arnold, curatorial assistant, our small research group was led by scholar Jerry Vogel across the country for a short, in-depth exposure to the major art producing groups in Côte d’Ivoire. We began by exploring the contemporary art scene in Abidjan and continued the trip with extended visits to different cultural and geographic regions across the country. We had the opportunity to meet with sculptors, weavers, and bronze-casters, to witness dynamic masquerade performances, and to visit cities and villages with a fascinating range of historical architecture.
Côte d’Ivoire is the point of origin for a range of works in the museum’s collection. In four posts over the course of the next few weeks, Roger and I will share some of the ways in which our Côte d’Ivoire trip revealed surprising and exciting connections to works in the collection. In the meantime, you can find a selection of images, video, and observations collected from the trip on Twitter.

Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo
You may have already gathered from following the museum’s Twitter (and perhaps from following #CIVTrip2014) that the African art office recently returned from a 3-week trip to Côte d’Ivoire in West Africa. Joined by colleagues from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Africa Center, as well as Roger Arnold, curatorial assistant, our small research group was led by scholar Jerry Vogel across the country for a short, in-depth exposure to the major art producing groups in Côte d’Ivoire. We began by exploring the contemporary art scene in Abidjan and continued the trip with extended visits to different cultural and geographic regions across the country. We had the opportunity to meet with sculptors, weavers, and bronze-casters, to witness dynamic masquerade performances, and to visit cities and villages with a fascinating range of historical architecture.
Côte d’Ivoire is the point of origin for a range of works in the museum’s collection. In four posts over the course of the next few weeks, Roger and I will share some of the ways in which our Côte d’Ivoire trip revealed surprising and exciting connections to works in the collection. In the meantime, you can find a selection of images, video, and observations collected from the trip on Twitter.

Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo

You may have already gathered from following the museum’s Twitter (and perhaps from following #CIVTrip2014) that the African art office recently returned from a 3-week trip to Côte d’Ivoire in West Africa. Joined by colleagues from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Africa Center, as well as Roger Arnold, curatorial assistant, our small research group was led by scholar Jerry Vogel across the country for a short, in-depth exposure to the major art producing groups in Côte d’Ivoire. We began by exploring the contemporary art scene in Abidjan and continued the trip with extended visits to different cultural and geographic regions across the country. We had the opportunity to meet with sculptors, weavers, and bronze-casters, to witness dynamic masquerade performances, and to visit cities and villages with a fascinating range of historical architecture.

Côte d’Ivoire is the point of origin for a range of works in the museum’s collection. In four posts over the course of the next few weeks, Roger and I will share some of the ways in which our Côte d’Ivoire trip revealed surprising and exciting connections to works in the collection. In the meantime, you can find a selection of images, video, and observations collected from the trip on Twitter.

Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle

Artist David Horvitz dropped off Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne) to the Brooklyn Museum Library today! We are delighted to be the recipient of Horvitz’s Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne): an editioned group show in the form of archival boxes filled with works from two dozen international artists. We now have one of these “valises” which have been mailed as unsolicited donations to 31 museum libraries around the world. Brooklyn is one of them! Timely as we will be showcasing Horvitz’s work in our upcoming exhibition #CrossingBrooklyn.

Posted by Kim Loconto

 
ZoomInfo
Artist David Horvitz dropped off Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne) to the Brooklyn Museum Library today! We are delighted to be the recipient of Horvitz’s Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne): an editioned group show in the form of archival boxes filled with works from two dozen international artists. We now have one of these “valises” which have been mailed as unsolicited donations to 31 museum libraries around the world. Brooklyn is one of them! Timely as we will be showcasing Horvitz’s work in our upcoming exhibition #CrossingBrooklyn.

Posted by Kim Loconto

 
ZoomInfo
Artist David Horvitz dropped off Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne) to the Brooklyn Museum Library today! We are delighted to be the recipient of Horvitz’s Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne): an editioned group show in the form of archival boxes filled with works from two dozen international artists. We now have one of these “valises” which have been mailed as unsolicited donations to 31 museum libraries around the world. Brooklyn is one of them! Timely as we will be showcasing Horvitz’s work in our upcoming exhibition #CrossingBrooklyn.

Posted by Kim Loconto

 
ZoomInfo
Artist David Horvitz dropped off Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne) to the Brooklyn Museum Library today! We are delighted to be the recipient of Horvitz’s Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne): an editioned group show in the form of archival boxes filled with works from two dozen international artists. We now have one of these “valises” which have been mailed as unsolicited donations to 31 museum libraries around the world. Brooklyn is one of them! Timely as we will be showcasing Horvitz’s work in our upcoming exhibition #CrossingBrooklyn.

Posted by Kim Loconto

 
ZoomInfo

Artist David Horvitz dropped off Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne) to the Brooklyn Museum Library today! We are delighted to be the recipient of Horvitz’s Cigarette Beetle (Lasioderma serricorne): an editioned group show in the form of archival boxes filled with works from two dozen international artists. We now have one of these “valises” which have been mailed as unsolicited donations to 31 museum libraries around the world. Brooklyn is one of them! Timely as we will be showcasing Horvitz’s work in our upcoming exhibition #CrossingBrooklyn.

Posted by Kim Loconto

 

Forward Thinking: 3D Printing is a new class in which children are using fabrication tools to both learn about art and make art. I feel very lucky to be teaching a group of magical tweens through the Gallery Studio Program. My goal for this class has been to teach 3D scanning, modeling and printing as art-making processes. Class projects are anchored in sculptures at the museum. In order to gain confidence expressing themselves digitally, students have engaged with drawing, clay and painting alongside 3D modeling, scanning and printing. 
In the first few classes kids worked on 3D scanning each others’ heads to 3D print busts of themselves, inspired by Fred Wilson’s ceramic busts of Nefertiti colored in light and dark flesh tones for Gray Area (Brown Version). Students worked through ideas of representation by creating headpieces for their busts that depict their talents and interests, inspired by the Beaded Crown (Ade) of Onijagbo Obasoro Alowolodu. This artifact, which we 3D scanned as a group, is decorated in horses and warriors to show the Yoruba King’s military prowess. Inspired by the core ideas and formal qualities of these works, students created their own original sculptures using 3D printing.
Our 3D printing classes were sponsored by Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation through their Art & Emerging Technology grant program, which advances the usage of interactive technologies in cultural institutions. 

Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
Forward Thinking: 3D Printing is a new class in which children are using fabrication tools to both learn about art and make art. I feel very lucky to be teaching a group of magical tweens through the Gallery Studio Program. My goal for this class has been to teach 3D scanning, modeling and printing as art-making processes. Class projects are anchored in sculptures at the museum. In order to gain confidence expressing themselves digitally, students have engaged with drawing, clay and painting alongside 3D modeling, scanning and printing. 
In the first few classes kids worked on 3D scanning each others’ heads to 3D print busts of themselves, inspired by Fred Wilson’s ceramic busts of Nefertiti colored in light and dark flesh tones for Gray Area (Brown Version). Students worked through ideas of representation by creating headpieces for their busts that depict their talents and interests, inspired by the Beaded Crown (Ade) of Onijagbo Obasoro Alowolodu. This artifact, which we 3D scanned as a group, is decorated in horses and warriors to show the Yoruba King’s military prowess. Inspired by the core ideas and formal qualities of these works, students created their own original sculptures using 3D printing.
Our 3D printing classes were sponsored by Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation through their Art & Emerging Technology grant program, which advances the usage of interactive technologies in cultural institutions. 

Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
Forward Thinking: 3D Printing is a new class in which children are using fabrication tools to both learn about art and make art. I feel very lucky to be teaching a group of magical tweens through the Gallery Studio Program. My goal for this class has been to teach 3D scanning, modeling and printing as art-making processes. Class projects are anchored in sculptures at the museum. In order to gain confidence expressing themselves digitally, students have engaged with drawing, clay and painting alongside 3D modeling, scanning and printing. 
In the first few classes kids worked on 3D scanning each others’ heads to 3D print busts of themselves, inspired by Fred Wilson’s ceramic busts of Nefertiti colored in light and dark flesh tones for Gray Area (Brown Version). Students worked through ideas of representation by creating headpieces for their busts that depict their talents and interests, inspired by the Beaded Crown (Ade) of Onijagbo Obasoro Alowolodu. This artifact, which we 3D scanned as a group, is decorated in horses and warriors to show the Yoruba King’s military prowess. Inspired by the core ideas and formal qualities of these works, students created their own original sculptures using 3D printing.
Our 3D printing classes were sponsored by Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation through their Art & Emerging Technology grant program, which advances the usage of interactive technologies in cultural institutions. 

Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
Forward Thinking: 3D Printing is a new class in which children are using fabrication tools to both learn about art and make art. I feel very lucky to be teaching a group of magical tweens through the Gallery Studio Program. My goal for this class has been to teach 3D scanning, modeling and printing as art-making processes. Class projects are anchored in sculptures at the museum. In order to gain confidence expressing themselves digitally, students have engaged with drawing, clay and painting alongside 3D modeling, scanning and printing. 
In the first few classes kids worked on 3D scanning each others’ heads to 3D print busts of themselves, inspired by Fred Wilson’s ceramic busts of Nefertiti colored in light and dark flesh tones for Gray Area (Brown Version). Students worked through ideas of representation by creating headpieces for their busts that depict their talents and interests, inspired by the Beaded Crown (Ade) of Onijagbo Obasoro Alowolodu. This artifact, which we 3D scanned as a group, is decorated in horses and warriors to show the Yoruba King’s military prowess. Inspired by the core ideas and formal qualities of these works, students created their own original sculptures using 3D printing.
Our 3D printing classes were sponsored by Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation through their Art & Emerging Technology grant program, which advances the usage of interactive technologies in cultural institutions. 

Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo

Forward Thinking: 3D Printing is a new class in which children are using fabrication tools to both learn about art and make art. I feel very lucky to be teaching a group of magical tweens through the Gallery Studio Program. My goal for this class has been to teach 3D scanning, modeling and printing as art-making processes. Class projects are anchored in sculptures at the museum. In order to gain confidence expressing themselves digitally, students have engaged with drawing, clay and painting alongside 3D modeling, scanning and printing.

In the first few classes kids worked on 3D scanning each others’ heads to 3D print busts of themselves, inspired by Fred Wilson’s ceramic busts of Nefertiti colored in light and dark flesh tones for Gray Area (Brown Version). Students worked through ideas of representation by creating headpieces for their busts that depict their talents and interests, inspired by the Beaded Crown (Ade) of Onijagbo Obasoro Alowolodu. This artifact, which we 3D scanned as a group, is decorated in horses and warriors to show the Yoruba King’s military prowess. Inspired by the core ideas and formal qualities of these works, students created their own original sculptures using 3D printing.

Our 3D printing classes were sponsored by Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation through their Art & Emerging Technology grant program, which advances the usage of interactive technologies in cultural institutions. 

Posted by Ana Fernandez

#AiWeiwei once said "a small act is worth a million thoughts” and his show Ai Weiwei: According to What? is no small act. The works featured in the show span more than twenty years of his art and #activism — there is a lot to take in and it is not to be missed. 

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
#AiWeiwei once said "a small act is worth a million thoughts” and his show Ai Weiwei: According to What? is no small act. The works featured in the show span more than twenty years of his art and #activism — there is a lot to take in and it is not to be missed. 

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
#AiWeiwei once said "a small act is worth a million thoughts” and his show Ai Weiwei: According to What? is no small act. The works featured in the show span more than twenty years of his art and #activism — there is a lot to take in and it is not to be missed. 

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
#AiWeiwei once said "a small act is worth a million thoughts” and his show Ai Weiwei: According to What? is no small act. The works featured in the show span more than twenty years of his art and #activism — there is a lot to take in and it is not to be missed. 

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo

#AiWeiwei once said "a small act is worth a million thoughts” and his show Ai Weiwei: According to What? is no small act. The works featured in the show span more than twenty years of his art and #activism — there is a lot to take in and it is not to be missed. 

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler

There have been a lot of #swoonstreetart pieces spotted around Brooklyn recently. Here’s brooklynstreetart found in Red Hook. Much like her art that lives outdoors, her installation will not last forever — ”Swoon: Submerged Motherlands" ends Aug 24th.

brooklynstreetart:

Swoon RED wall in RED HOOK with two weeks left of “Submerged Motherlands” @brooklynmuseum http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/2014/08/05/swoon-across-a-red-corrugated-wall-in-red-hook/#.U-EHjEiWWK8
photo © Jaime Rojo

There’s only one week left! Ai Weiwei: According to What? ends this Sunday, August 10. Become a Member and enjoy private viewing hours on Saturday August 9 from 11am-12pm. Visit the exhibition to see He Xie a work of 3,200 porcelain crabs on our fourth floor!

Love our new Membership #GIF series featuring #RachelMaddow #JeffGoldblum #AiWeiwei? yomeryl has more where that came from. Stay tuned. http://bit.ly/MemberGIF 

Posted by Brooke Affleck

As we gear up for August’s Target First Saturday we are thrilled to be working with partners such as caribBEING, Haiti Cultural Exchange, and BUTCH DIVA. Each organization is truly excited to be working with the museum to co-present the best of the best from their community. We had a chance to catch up with Tiffany Rhodes, Founder of BUTCH DIVA and lead producer of our fashion show for the evening. Check out what she had to say: 
"Words cannot quite describe how overwhelmingly excited I am to share this collection Saturday, inspired by all the colors and vibes of the island during carnival season! There’s a story to be told with this presentation, and it’s such an honor to be hosted by the Brooklyn Museum, especially following exhibits such as the one they had for Jean Paul Gaultier earlier this year! I will also be joined by peer designer for Toure, and the dance moves of celebrity choreographer Tanisha Scott in opening the show with a tribute to Queen Patra. I feel blessed with inspiration ooozing thru my pores! It’s going to truly be an epic experience - one for the history books!  My soul went into this, and the pieces were made WITH LOVE!"

Posted by Alicia Boone | Photos: Tiffany Rhodes
ZoomInfo
As we gear up for August’s Target First Saturday we are thrilled to be working with partners such as caribBEING, Haiti Cultural Exchange, and BUTCH DIVA. Each organization is truly excited to be working with the museum to co-present the best of the best from their community. We had a chance to catch up with Tiffany Rhodes, Founder of BUTCH DIVA and lead producer of our fashion show for the evening. Check out what she had to say: 
"Words cannot quite describe how overwhelmingly excited I am to share this collection Saturday, inspired by all the colors and vibes of the island during carnival season! There’s a story to be told with this presentation, and it’s such an honor to be hosted by the Brooklyn Museum, especially following exhibits such as the one they had for Jean Paul Gaultier earlier this year! I will also be joined by peer designer for Toure, and the dance moves of celebrity choreographer Tanisha Scott in opening the show with a tribute to Queen Patra. I feel blessed with inspiration ooozing thru my pores! It’s going to truly be an epic experience - one for the history books!  My soul went into this, and the pieces were made WITH LOVE!"

Posted by Alicia Boone | Photos: Tiffany Rhodes
ZoomInfo
As we gear up for August’s Target First Saturday we are thrilled to be working with partners such as caribBEING, Haiti Cultural Exchange, and BUTCH DIVA. Each organization is truly excited to be working with the museum to co-present the best of the best from their community. We had a chance to catch up with Tiffany Rhodes, Founder of BUTCH DIVA and lead producer of our fashion show for the evening. Check out what she had to say: 
"Words cannot quite describe how overwhelmingly excited I am to share this collection Saturday, inspired by all the colors and vibes of the island during carnival season! There’s a story to be told with this presentation, and it’s such an honor to be hosted by the Brooklyn Museum, especially following exhibits such as the one they had for Jean Paul Gaultier earlier this year! I will also be joined by peer designer for Toure, and the dance moves of celebrity choreographer Tanisha Scott in opening the show with a tribute to Queen Patra. I feel blessed with inspiration ooozing thru my pores! It’s going to truly be an epic experience - one for the history books!  My soul went into this, and the pieces were made WITH LOVE!"

Posted by Alicia Boone | Photos: Tiffany Rhodes
ZoomInfo

As we gear up for August’s Target First Saturday we are thrilled to be working with partners such as caribBEING, Haiti Cultural Exchange, and BUTCH DIVA. Each organization is truly excited to be working with the museum to co-present the best of the best from their community. We had a chance to catch up with Tiffany Rhodes, Founder of BUTCH DIVA and lead producer of our fashion show for the evening. Check out what she had to say: 

"Words cannot quite describe how overwhelmingly excited I am to share this collection Saturday, inspired by all the colors and vibes of the island during carnival season! There’s a story to be told with this presentation, and it’s such an honor to be hosted by the Brooklyn Museum, especially following exhibits such as the one they had for Jean Paul Gaultier earlier this year! I will also be joined by peer designer for Toure, and the dance moves of celebrity choreographer Tanisha Scott in opening the show with a tribute to Queen Patra. I feel blessed with inspiration ooozing thru my pores! It’s going to truly be an epic experience - one for the history books!  My soul went into this, and the pieces were made WITH LOVE!"

Posted by Alicia Boone | Photos: Tiffany Rhodes

Ai Weiwei: According to What? is closing on Sunday, August 10. Become a Member and enjoy private viewing hours on Saturday August 2 and 9 from 11am-12pm. Don’t miss Stacked an installation of 760 bicycles on our first floor!

Love our new Membership #GIF series featuring #RachelMaddow #JeffGoldblum #AiWeiwei? yomeryl has more where that came from. Stay tuned. http://bit.ly/MemberGIF 

Posted by Brooke Affleck

We are thrilled to be working with Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai and her collaborators for tomorrow’s Art Off the Wall and Kelly shared the following about her performance, “Ai Wei Wei: The Seed”:
This process has been one full of challenge, invention, revelation. We’ve had such rich conversations about what it means to be an artist and activist, Asian and American, as well as what freedom and democracy mean in both our own communities here in Brooklyn and Ai’s context in Beijing.  
This project is a little glimpse into how our world may be much smaller than it seems, what is ordinary can inspire the extraordinary, and the creative spirit is at the root of survival, protest, and envisioning new futures for ourselves. 
We hope that everyone who comes tomorrow night comes away with what we as collaborators have gained as we worked together to combine spoken word, dance, video, and live music/sound - a new place to stretch and grow into as we fight for what we believe in and understand every day these different places and communities that we call home. 
The evening will also feature a curator's talk, a workshop with the Asian American Oral History Collective, and drop-in calligraphy.

Posted by Alicia Boone | Images via Kelly Zen Tsai
ZoomInfo
We are thrilled to be working with Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai and her collaborators for tomorrow’s Art Off the Wall and Kelly shared the following about her performance, “Ai Wei Wei: The Seed”:
This process has been one full of challenge, invention, revelation. We’ve had such rich conversations about what it means to be an artist and activist, Asian and American, as well as what freedom and democracy mean in both our own communities here in Brooklyn and Ai’s context in Beijing.  
This project is a little glimpse into how our world may be much smaller than it seems, what is ordinary can inspire the extraordinary, and the creative spirit is at the root of survival, protest, and envisioning new futures for ourselves. 
We hope that everyone who comes tomorrow night comes away with what we as collaborators have gained as we worked together to combine spoken word, dance, video, and live music/sound - a new place to stretch and grow into as we fight for what we believe in and understand every day these different places and communities that we call home. 
The evening will also feature a curator's talk, a workshop with the Asian American Oral History Collective, and drop-in calligraphy.

Posted by Alicia Boone | Images via Kelly Zen Tsai
ZoomInfo
We are thrilled to be working with Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai and her collaborators for tomorrow’s Art Off the Wall and Kelly shared the following about her performance, “Ai Wei Wei: The Seed”:
This process has been one full of challenge, invention, revelation. We’ve had such rich conversations about what it means to be an artist and activist, Asian and American, as well as what freedom and democracy mean in both our own communities here in Brooklyn and Ai’s context in Beijing.  
This project is a little glimpse into how our world may be much smaller than it seems, what is ordinary can inspire the extraordinary, and the creative spirit is at the root of survival, protest, and envisioning new futures for ourselves. 
We hope that everyone who comes tomorrow night comes away with what we as collaborators have gained as we worked together to combine spoken word, dance, video, and live music/sound - a new place to stretch and grow into as we fight for what we believe in and understand every day these different places and communities that we call home. 
The evening will also feature a curator's talk, a workshop with the Asian American Oral History Collective, and drop-in calligraphy.

Posted by Alicia Boone | Images via Kelly Zen Tsai
ZoomInfo

We are thrilled to be working with Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai and her collaborators for tomorrow’s Art Off the Wall and Kelly shared the following about her performance, “Ai Wei Wei: The Seed”:

This process has been one full of challenge, invention, revelation. We’ve had such rich conversations about what it means to be an artist and activist, Asian and American, as well as what freedom and democracy mean in both our own communities here in Brooklyn and Ai’s context in Beijing.  

This project is a little glimpse into how our world may be much smaller than it seems, what is ordinary can inspire the extraordinary, and the creative spirit is at the root of survival, protest, and envisioning new futures for ourselves. 

We hope that everyone who comes tomorrow night comes away with what we as collaborators have gained as we worked together to combine spoken word, dance, video, and live music/sound - a new place to stretch and grow into as we fight for what we believe in and understand every day these different places and communities that we call home. 

The evening will also feature a curator's talk, a workshop with the Asian American Oral History Collective, and drop-in calligraphy.

Posted by Alicia Boone | Images via Kelly Zen Tsai

Happy Bastille Day! The storming of the Bastille prison in Paris on July 14, 1789 marked the beginning of the French Revolution and the beginning of the end for Queen Marie Antoinette, who died on the guillotine four years later. Her head, and the elaborate wigs she favored, are treated more kindly in the “Marie Antoinette” peep toe stiletto by Christian Louboutin. You can view this shoe, and many others, when Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe opens this September.

Posted by Lisa SmallImage: Christian Louboutin (French). “Marie-Antoinette”, Fall/Winter 2008–9. Courtesy of Christian Louboutin.Photographed by Jay Zukerkorn
ZoomInfo
Happy Bastille Day! The storming of the Bastille prison in Paris on July 14, 1789 marked the beginning of the French Revolution and the beginning of the end for Queen Marie Antoinette, who died on the guillotine four years later. Her head, and the elaborate wigs she favored, are treated more kindly in the “Marie Antoinette” peep toe stiletto by Christian Louboutin. You can view this shoe, and many others, when Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe opens this September.

Posted by Lisa SmallImage: Christian Louboutin (French). “Marie-Antoinette”, Fall/Winter 2008–9. Courtesy of Christian Louboutin.Photographed by Jay Zukerkorn
ZoomInfo

Happy Bastille Day! The storming of the Bastille prison in Paris on July 14, 1789 marked the beginning of the French Revolution and the beginning of the end for Queen Marie Antoinette, who died on the guillotine four years later. Her head, and the elaborate wigs she favored, are treated more kindly in the “Marie Antoinette” peep toe stiletto by Christian Louboutin. You can view this shoe, and many others, when Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe opens this September.

Posted by Lisa Small
Image: Christian Louboutin (French). “Marie-Antoinette”, Fall/Winter 2008–9. Courtesy of Christian Louboutin.
Photographed by Jay Zukerkorn

Why is Independence Day especially meaningful for the Brooklyn Museum?

On July 4, 1825, General Lafayette laid the cornerstone for the new building of the Brooklyn Apprentices’ Library in Brooklyn Heights, and it became the first free and circulating library in Brooklyn. Walt Whitman was one of its librarians and reminisced about this historic event in his writings for the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. The Brooklyn Museum’s own Principal Librarian Deirdre Lawrence has written about Whitman’s early years in Brooklyn.

The Brooklyn Apprentices’ Library later evolved into the Brooklyn Institute and eventually into the Brooklyn Museum.

Posted by Eunice Liu
Image: Apprentices’ Library Association, Corner of Henry and Cranberry Streets, engraving from the Brooklyn Museum Archives.

Fifty years ago today, The Civil Rights Act of 1964, is signed into law by President Johnson. Initiated by John F. Kennedy a year before, the law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Our exhibition Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties celebrates this anniversary by exploring the intersection of art making and activism in support of the struggle for racial equality during the sixties.

In case you still haven’t had a chance to see it, you now have extra time! We’ve extended its run and it will now be up through July 13.

Posted by Dalila Scruggs

(Source: lbjlibrary.net)