We are thrilled to be working with Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai and her collaborators for tomorrow’s Art Off the Wall and Kelly shared the following about her performance, “Ai Wei Wei: The Seed”:
This process has been one full of challenge, invention, revelation. We’ve had such rich conversations about what it means to be an artist and activist, Asian and American, as well as what freedom and democracy mean in both our own communities here in Brooklyn and Ai’s context in Beijing.  
This project is a little glimpse into how our world may be much smaller than it seems, what is ordinary can inspire the extraordinary, and the creative spirit is at the root of survival, protest, and envisioning new futures for ourselves. 
We hope that everyone who comes tomorrow night comes away with what we as collaborators have gained as we worked together to combine spoken word, dance, video, and live music/sound - a new place to stretch and grow into as we fight for what we believe in and understand every day these different places and communities that we call home. 
The evening will also feature a curator's talk, a workshop with the Asian American Oral History Collective, and drop-in calligraphy.

Posted by Alicia Boone | Images via Kelly Zen Tsai
ZoomInfo
We are thrilled to be working with Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai and her collaborators for tomorrow’s Art Off the Wall and Kelly shared the following about her performance, “Ai Wei Wei: The Seed”:
This process has been one full of challenge, invention, revelation. We’ve had such rich conversations about what it means to be an artist and activist, Asian and American, as well as what freedom and democracy mean in both our own communities here in Brooklyn and Ai’s context in Beijing.  
This project is a little glimpse into how our world may be much smaller than it seems, what is ordinary can inspire the extraordinary, and the creative spirit is at the root of survival, protest, and envisioning new futures for ourselves. 
We hope that everyone who comes tomorrow night comes away with what we as collaborators have gained as we worked together to combine spoken word, dance, video, and live music/sound - a new place to stretch and grow into as we fight for what we believe in and understand every day these different places and communities that we call home. 
The evening will also feature a curator's talk, a workshop with the Asian American Oral History Collective, and drop-in calligraphy.

Posted by Alicia Boone | Images via Kelly Zen Tsai
ZoomInfo
We are thrilled to be working with Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai and her collaborators for tomorrow’s Art Off the Wall and Kelly shared the following about her performance, “Ai Wei Wei: The Seed”:
This process has been one full of challenge, invention, revelation. We’ve had such rich conversations about what it means to be an artist and activist, Asian and American, as well as what freedom and democracy mean in both our own communities here in Brooklyn and Ai’s context in Beijing.  
This project is a little glimpse into how our world may be much smaller than it seems, what is ordinary can inspire the extraordinary, and the creative spirit is at the root of survival, protest, and envisioning new futures for ourselves. 
We hope that everyone who comes tomorrow night comes away with what we as collaborators have gained as we worked together to combine spoken word, dance, video, and live music/sound - a new place to stretch and grow into as we fight for what we believe in and understand every day these different places and communities that we call home. 
The evening will also feature a curator's talk, a workshop with the Asian American Oral History Collective, and drop-in calligraphy.

Posted by Alicia Boone | Images via Kelly Zen Tsai
ZoomInfo

We are thrilled to be working with Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai and her collaborators for tomorrow’s Art Off the Wall and Kelly shared the following about her performance, “Ai Wei Wei: The Seed”:

This process has been one full of challenge, invention, revelation. We’ve had such rich conversations about what it means to be an artist and activist, Asian and American, as well as what freedom and democracy mean in both our own communities here in Brooklyn and Ai’s context in Beijing.  

This project is a little glimpse into how our world may be much smaller than it seems, what is ordinary can inspire the extraordinary, and the creative spirit is at the root of survival, protest, and envisioning new futures for ourselves. 

We hope that everyone who comes tomorrow night comes away with what we as collaborators have gained as we worked together to combine spoken word, dance, video, and live music/sound - a new place to stretch and grow into as we fight for what we believe in and understand every day these different places and communities that we call home. 

The evening will also feature a curator's talk, a workshop with the Asian American Oral History Collective, and drop-in calligraphy.

Posted by Alicia Boone | Images via Kelly Zen Tsai

Happy Bastille Day! The storming of the Bastille prison in Paris on July 14, 1789 marked the beginning of the French Revolution and the beginning of the end for Queen Marie Antoinette, who died on the guillotine four years later. Her head, and the elaborate wigs she favored, are treated more kindly in the “Marie Antoinette” peep toe stiletto by Christian Louboutin. You can view this shoe, and many others, when Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe opens this September.

Posted by Lisa SmallImage: Christian Louboutin (French). “Marie-Antoinette”, Fall/Winter 2008–9. Courtesy of Christian Louboutin.Photographed by Jay Zukerkorn
ZoomInfo
Happy Bastille Day! The storming of the Bastille prison in Paris on July 14, 1789 marked the beginning of the French Revolution and the beginning of the end for Queen Marie Antoinette, who died on the guillotine four years later. Her head, and the elaborate wigs she favored, are treated more kindly in the “Marie Antoinette” peep toe stiletto by Christian Louboutin. You can view this shoe, and many others, when Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe opens this September.

Posted by Lisa SmallImage: Christian Louboutin (French). “Marie-Antoinette”, Fall/Winter 2008–9. Courtesy of Christian Louboutin.Photographed by Jay Zukerkorn
ZoomInfo

Happy Bastille Day! The storming of the Bastille prison in Paris on July 14, 1789 marked the beginning of the French Revolution and the beginning of the end for Queen Marie Antoinette, who died on the guillotine four years later. Her head, and the elaborate wigs she favored, are treated more kindly in the “Marie Antoinette” peep toe stiletto by Christian Louboutin. You can view this shoe, and many others, when Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe opens this September.

Posted by Lisa Small
Image: Christian Louboutin (French). “Marie-Antoinette”, Fall/Winter 2008–9. Courtesy of Christian Louboutin.
Photographed by Jay Zukerkorn

Why is Independence Day especially meaningful for the Brooklyn Museum?

On July 4, 1825, General Lafayette laid the cornerstone for the new building of the Brooklyn Apprentices’ Library in Brooklyn Heights, and it became the first free and circulating library in Brooklyn. Walt Whitman was one of its librarians and reminisced about this historic event in his writings for the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. The Brooklyn Museum’s own Principal Librarian Deirdre Lawrence has written about Whitman’s early years in Brooklyn.

The Brooklyn Apprentices’ Library later evolved into the Brooklyn Institute and eventually into the Brooklyn Museum.

Posted by Eunice Liu
Image: Apprentices’ Library Association, Corner of Henry and Cranberry Streets, engraving from the Brooklyn Museum Archives.

Fifty years ago today, The Civil Rights Act of 1964, is signed into law by President Johnson. Initiated by John F. Kennedy a year before, the law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Our exhibition Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties celebrates this anniversary by exploring the intersection of art making and activism in support of the struggle for racial equality during the sixties.

In case you still haven’t had a chance to see it, you now have extra time! We’ve extended its run and it will now be up through July 13.

Posted by Dalila Scruggs

(Source: lbjlibrary.net)

About a year ago a visitor called me up to say how much he and his son enjoy watching the fountain in our front plaza.  If you’ve never seen it, the Jane and David Walentas Fountain outside is a community meeting spot.  Its dancing water jets are kind of mesmerizing (believe me, I’ve spent a lot of time staring at it these past couple weeks), and it provides a really nice respite from bustling Eastern Parkway.  So, this visitor called and said he was thinking about how great it would be if the fountain had music to accompany it.  Like, what if the Museum invited musicians to create compositions for it?  Thus, the idea for “Score the Fountain” was born!

This summer we are calling on composers and producers of all music genres to create a musical interpretation from this video of the fountain. What do you think the fountain would sound like if it were music?  We can’t wait to hear your score!

P.S. Thanks, Micah, for giving us the inspiration for this project. We love working with folks to bring their ideas to life – check out how to submit an idea on our First Saturday page.

Posted by Elisabeth Callihan

(Source: youtube.com)

In honor of legendary entertainer Judy Garland, who would have been 92-years old today, enjoy this amazing rainbow suede platform sandal designed by Salvatore Ferragamo in 1938, just one year before Garland sang “Over the Rainbow” in The Wizard of Oz. Be sure to come check out this sandal—and many other incredible “way up high” designs—in Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe, opening on September 10.

Posted by Lisa Small
Image: ©The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

(Source: metmuseum.org)

Over the past few months the Museum has been abuzz with exhibitions and programs exploring the intersection of art and activism—here in Brooklyn, across the country, and around the world.

This Target First Saturday (6/7) we are continuing our season of #activism with a celebration of LGBTQ communities in Brooklyn and of artists who use their work as a vehicle for social change. This lineup is not to be missed. Katy Pyle and the Ballez perform a gender-bending remix of Stravinsky’s ballet The Firebird; Bushwig’s Horrorchata and Macy Rodman host a Brooklyn drag showcase; and for those of you not content with watching, Benny Ninja Training Academy leads a voguing workshop. “But Jessie, what is this voguing you speak of?” Watch this and start fine-tuning your strut. The night ends with the pop sounds and synchronized dance greatness of AVAN LAVA. But we’re not all fancy footwork here at the Brooklyn Museum. You can also engage in critical discussions with local artists and organizations and get involved with LGBTQ activism in Brooklyn. 

Dance, celebrate, advocate. Show your pride

Posted by Jessie Frazier
Photo: Maro Hagopian

(Source: bushwig.com)

Showing at the Japan Society until June 8th, Points of Departure: Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum is an exhibition illustrating over two thousand years of Japan’s history of art through the paintings, prints, sculptures, and decorative objects currently on display from the Brooklyn Museum’s renowned collection of Japanese art.
The exhibition’s theme revolves around the four cardinal points of a compass, guiding the viewer through the various forms of artistic production that were practiced around different parts of Japan: the hemp-fiber robes and beaded necklaces produced by the Ainu in northern Japan, for example, are juxtaposed against screen paintings depicting Kyoto’s colourful city life. Many of the works are on view for the first time in decades and, for some objects, for the first ever. 

Posted by Amanda TsaoPhoto: Richard Goodbody
ZoomInfo

Showing at the Japan Society until June 8th, Points of Departure: Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum is an exhibition illustrating over two thousand years of Japan’s history of art through the paintings, prints, sculptures, and decorative objects currently on display from the Brooklyn Museum’s renowned collection of Japanese art.

The exhibition’s theme revolves around the four cardinal points of a compass, guiding the viewer through the various forms of artistic production that were practiced around different parts of Japan: the hemp-fiber robes and beaded necklaces produced by the Ainu in northern Japan, for example, are juxtaposed against screen paintings depicting Kyoto’s colourful city life. Many of the works are on view for the first time in decades and, for some objects, for the first ever. 

Posted by Amanda Tsao
Photo: Richard Goodbody

(Source: brooklynmuseum.org)

Attention classical music fans:  Brooklyn Symphony Orchestra's performance next Sunday (6/1) will feature works by Sergei Prokofiev and Eli Greenhoe, as well as a live scored film set to Hector Berlioz’s Symphonie Fantastique.

Tours exploring the connections between art and music will precede and follow the performance.

An Egyptian painted mummy shroud is undergoing an exciting conservation treatment and Rita Berg is discussing various stages along the way.

BkM conservators are faced with a challenging task of consolidating the flaking and powdering paint layers on a two-thousand year old painted mummy shroud. Prior to doing any work on the original, a series of mock-ups were prepared in order to conduct testing of various adhesives. The mock-ups, as seen in this image, reproduce the layers of the original painted textile using linen strips that have been primed with rabbit skin glue, covered with gesso, and painted with dry pigments bound in animal glue or gum arabic. To reproduce the type of damaged surface that is seen on the original, the mock-ups were distressed by folding, creasing, and scratching. 

For testing, conservators selected natural glues that are compatible with the materials of the shroud. These included funori (an extract from seaweed), isinglass (a water soluble glue made from fish bladders), and gelatin (a mixture of proteins obtained from skin, ligaments, and tendons). Different mixtures and methods of application were tested to find the best result without altering the matte appearance of the paint surface.

Next post I’ll discuss the consolidation technique selected for the original shroud.

Posted by Rita Berg

In a previous post, I described Genealogy of the old and very illustrious family of Schenck van Nydeck […], a book that was recently donated to BkM Libraries and Archives. Some of its entries are a simple listing of dates and names, but others contain more, as well as more interesting, information. One of these more interesting entries occurs during the twelfth generation listed:

Captain Jan Schenck van Nydeck was born in Monmouth, New Jersey and, according to the author, was the best of men: hardworking, thrifty, successful, and a true patriot. His actions in the Revolutionary War seem to have been extraordinary due to his “dash, perseverance, and endurance.” The entry tells a story of his sister, Anne, who overheard a conversation between two British officers in Long Island, in which they named the price on Jan’s head as fifty guineas. In addition to offering money for his death, the British attempted to lure him to their side by offering him money. Jan’s response exemplified the revolutionary spirit, as he told the British: “The whole of Europe cannot buy me. Give me liberty!”

Interested in the lives of Schenck family? Join us this Saturday (5/24) for a free tour of their early Dutch houses on view in the Period Rooms.  

Posted by Katy Christensen

Lorraine O’Grady is an artist and critic whose installations, performances, and texts address issues of diaspora, hybridity, and black female subjectivity. In her work, the idea tends to come first, and then a medium is employed to best execute it. Although its intellectual content is rigorous and political, the work is generally marked by unapologetic beauty and elegance.
Tonight, O’Grady will be here to discuss how conversations around “post-racial” and “postfeminist” political ideologies have impacted her work.
ZoomInfo
Lorraine O’Grady is an artist and critic whose installations, performances, and texts address issues of diaspora, hybridity, and black female subjectivity. In her work, the idea tends to come first, and then a medium is employed to best execute it. Although its intellectual content is rigorous and political, the work is generally marked by unapologetic beauty and elegance.
Tonight, O’Grady will be here to discuss how conversations around “post-racial” and “postfeminist” political ideologies have impacted her work.
ZoomInfo

Lorraine O’Grady is an artist and critic whose installations, performances, and texts address issues of diaspora, hybridity, and black female subjectivity. In her work, the idea tends to come first, and then a medium is employed to best execute it. Although its intellectual content is rigorous and political, the work is generally marked by unapologetic beauty and elegance.

Tonight, O’Grady will be here to discuss how conversations around “post-racial” and “postfeminist” political ideologies have impacted her work.

(Source: lorraineogrady.com)

Objects conservators gathered outside on this sunny day to clean architectural fragments that will be installed in the Sculpture Garden.  The fragments come from the exteriors of various buildings in the United States, many from the New York area. Some fragments are made of cast terracotta while others are made from carved stone. They have all spent time in an outdoor environment, which means that they have to be cleaned of dirt, debris, and biological growth that had accumulated on the surface.
Here, you can see conservators cleaning the fragments with brushes made with synthetic bristles, like toothbrushes and dish brushes.  In addition to water, a commercial biocide containing a non-ionic surfactant is also used to remove biological growth and dirt.  As a last step, all fragments are thoroughly rinsed with water to remove residual cleaning material.  They will go on display this summer for the first time.  

Posted by Jessica Pace
ZoomInfo
Objects conservators gathered outside on this sunny day to clean architectural fragments that will be installed in the Sculpture Garden.  The fragments come from the exteriors of various buildings in the United States, many from the New York area. Some fragments are made of cast terracotta while others are made from carved stone. They have all spent time in an outdoor environment, which means that they have to be cleaned of dirt, debris, and biological growth that had accumulated on the surface.
Here, you can see conservators cleaning the fragments with brushes made with synthetic bristles, like toothbrushes and dish brushes.  In addition to water, a commercial biocide containing a non-ionic surfactant is also used to remove biological growth and dirt.  As a last step, all fragments are thoroughly rinsed with water to remove residual cleaning material.  They will go on display this summer for the first time.  

Posted by Jessica Pace
ZoomInfo

Objects conservators gathered outside on this sunny day to clean architectural fragments that will be installed in the Sculpture Garden.  The fragments come from the exteriors of various buildings in the United States, many from the New York area. Some fragments are made of cast terracotta while others are made from carved stone. They have all spent time in an outdoor environment, which means that they have to be cleaned of dirt, debris, and biological growth that had accumulated on the surface.

Here, you can see conservators cleaning the fragments with brushes made with synthetic bristles, like toothbrushes and dish brushes.  In addition to water, a commercial biocide containing a non-ionic surfactant is also used to remove biological growth and dirt.  As a last step, all fragments are thoroughly rinsed with water to remove residual cleaning material.  They will go on display this summer for the first time. 

Posted by Jessica Pace

Last week, Gothamist posted an article highlighting a project Jordan Liles started using images from our collection of George Bradford Brainerd images. Liles researched the current locations of many of Brainerd’s historical photographs and re-photographed them in their current form. The result is a very intriguing collection of then & now comparisons of our beloved city. You can check out his project here. If you’re interested in seeing more of the wonderful images in our glass negative collection head on over to our website where thousands more are available to browse!

Posted by Tracie Davis

Urban Wall Suit' artist, Jae Jarrell, will be one of the participating artists in tomorrow's Witness Roundtables. Come by for a special day of conversation and performance dealing with #activism during the Civil Rights era and today. More on the event here: bit.ly/1nj8H3A

If you are unable to make it but would still like to join in on the conversation, we will be livestreaming our roundtable discussions.