Are you ready to take your career to the next level? This Thursday will mark the second in our #PowerShift series! Check out what Sara and Andrea from DELVE / kindaesthetic  had to say about their upcoming interactive (and fun!) workshop:
"You are the only person in the world who does exactly what you do in your unique way, and it’s our mission to help you, as an artist or creative, identify your exceptional story to share with the world. We’re thrilled to be part of Power Shift at the Brooklyn Museum this October 23rd. 
The Museum is the creative heart of our borough and the perfect backdrop to explore the necessary building blocks of effectively, genuinely, and powerfully communicating your professional art and creative practices through writing and stunning visuals. Artists will leave Power Shift inspired by the Museum’s vast collection and history, more organized to hone their professional skills, and with the readiness to harness their own power to do good for themselves and their creative community. 
We’re so excited to meet you, and for you all to meet each other.”
Come early for a custom Power Shift tour of some of our featured exhibitions at 6:30 p.m.

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo
Are you ready to take your career to the next level? This Thursday will mark the second in our #PowerShift series! Check out what Sara and Andrea from DELVE / kindaesthetic  had to say about their upcoming interactive (and fun!) workshop:
"You are the only person in the world who does exactly what you do in your unique way, and it’s our mission to help you, as an artist or creative, identify your exceptional story to share with the world. We’re thrilled to be part of Power Shift at the Brooklyn Museum this October 23rd. 
The Museum is the creative heart of our borough and the perfect backdrop to explore the necessary building blocks of effectively, genuinely, and powerfully communicating your professional art and creative practices through writing and stunning visuals. Artists will leave Power Shift inspired by the Museum’s vast collection and history, more organized to hone their professional skills, and with the readiness to harness their own power to do good for themselves and their creative community. 
We’re so excited to meet you, and for you all to meet each other.”
Come early for a custom Power Shift tour of some of our featured exhibitions at 6:30 p.m.

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo
Are you ready to take your career to the next level? This Thursday will mark the second in our #PowerShift series! Check out what Sara and Andrea from DELVE / kindaesthetic  had to say about their upcoming interactive (and fun!) workshop:
"You are the only person in the world who does exactly what you do in your unique way, and it’s our mission to help you, as an artist or creative, identify your exceptional story to share with the world. We’re thrilled to be part of Power Shift at the Brooklyn Museum this October 23rd. 
The Museum is the creative heart of our borough and the perfect backdrop to explore the necessary building blocks of effectively, genuinely, and powerfully communicating your professional art and creative practices through writing and stunning visuals. Artists will leave Power Shift inspired by the Museum’s vast collection and history, more organized to hone their professional skills, and with the readiness to harness their own power to do good for themselves and their creative community. 
We’re so excited to meet you, and for you all to meet each other.”
Come early for a custom Power Shift tour of some of our featured exhibitions at 6:30 p.m.

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo

Are you ready to take your career to the next level? This Thursday will mark the second in our #PowerShift series! Check out what Sara and Andrea from DELVE / kindaesthetic  had to say about their upcoming interactive (and fun!) workshop:

"You are the only person in the world who does exactly what you do in your unique way, and it’s our mission to help you, as an artist or creative, identify your exceptional story to share with the world. We’re thrilled to be part of Power Shift at the Brooklyn Museum this October 23rd.

The Museum is the creative heart of our borough and the perfect backdrop to explore the necessary building blocks of effectively, genuinely, and powerfully communicating your professional art and creative practices through writing and stunning visuals. Artists will leave Power Shift inspired by the Museum’s vast collection and history, more organized to hone their professional skills, and with the readiness to harness their own power to do good for themselves and their creative community.

We’re so excited to meet you, and for you all to meet each other.”

Come early for a custom Power Shift tour of some of our featured exhibitions at 6:30 p.m.

Posted by Alicia Boone

Auction catalogs from the #BKMlibrary continue to provide fascinating discoveries. Recently, I found a catalog comprising the collection of Charles Gillot filled with visual treasures! Who was Charles Gillot? Following the modern tradition of virtual research, I Googled him.
Charles Gillot (1853-1903) was a French inventor and avid collector of ancient and medieval works of art. His father, Firmin Gillot, invented “gillotage” a type of relief photoengraving that revolutionized book publishing; allowing simultaneous printing of text and images. Like father like son, Charles later made technical improvements upon this process, while concurrently amassing an immense amount of important art works. 
Following Gillot’s death, Durand-Ruel gallery in Paris conducted two auction sales of his collection primarily made up of Asian objects as well as Islamic antiquities. The 1904 sale received high praise from many notable figures of the time such as the Goncourt brothers, calling it “the most perfect, the most sophisticated Japanese collection.”
These beautiful auction catalogs are massive. Bound in two catalogs comprised of 3,453 lots—the delicate illustrations, marbled paper, and leather embossed horse are really something to behold!
The remainder of his collection was found 104 years after the original sale and Christie’s held the sale in 2008—owned by The Frick, one of our NYARC partners. 

Posted by Kim Loconto
ZoomInfo
Auction catalogs from the #BKMlibrary continue to provide fascinating discoveries. Recently, I found a catalog comprising the collection of Charles Gillot filled with visual treasures! Who was Charles Gillot? Following the modern tradition of virtual research, I Googled him.
Charles Gillot (1853-1903) was a French inventor and avid collector of ancient and medieval works of art. His father, Firmin Gillot, invented “gillotage” a type of relief photoengraving that revolutionized book publishing; allowing simultaneous printing of text and images. Like father like son, Charles later made technical improvements upon this process, while concurrently amassing an immense amount of important art works. 
Following Gillot’s death, Durand-Ruel gallery in Paris conducted two auction sales of his collection primarily made up of Asian objects as well as Islamic antiquities. The 1904 sale received high praise from many notable figures of the time such as the Goncourt brothers, calling it “the most perfect, the most sophisticated Japanese collection.”
These beautiful auction catalogs are massive. Bound in two catalogs comprised of 3,453 lots—the delicate illustrations, marbled paper, and leather embossed horse are really something to behold!
The remainder of his collection was found 104 years after the original sale and Christie’s held the sale in 2008—owned by The Frick, one of our NYARC partners. 

Posted by Kim Loconto
ZoomInfo
Auction catalogs from the #BKMlibrary continue to provide fascinating discoveries. Recently, I found a catalog comprising the collection of Charles Gillot filled with visual treasures! Who was Charles Gillot? Following the modern tradition of virtual research, I Googled him.
Charles Gillot (1853-1903) was a French inventor and avid collector of ancient and medieval works of art. His father, Firmin Gillot, invented “gillotage” a type of relief photoengraving that revolutionized book publishing; allowing simultaneous printing of text and images. Like father like son, Charles later made technical improvements upon this process, while concurrently amassing an immense amount of important art works. 
Following Gillot’s death, Durand-Ruel gallery in Paris conducted two auction sales of his collection primarily made up of Asian objects as well as Islamic antiquities. The 1904 sale received high praise from many notable figures of the time such as the Goncourt brothers, calling it “the most perfect, the most sophisticated Japanese collection.”
These beautiful auction catalogs are massive. Bound in two catalogs comprised of 3,453 lots—the delicate illustrations, marbled paper, and leather embossed horse are really something to behold!
The remainder of his collection was found 104 years after the original sale and Christie’s held the sale in 2008—owned by The Frick, one of our NYARC partners. 

Posted by Kim Loconto
ZoomInfo

Auction catalogs from the #BKMlibrary continue to provide fascinating discoveries. Recently, I found a catalog comprising the collection of Charles Gillot filled with visual treasures! Who was Charles Gillot? Following the modern tradition of virtual research, I Googled him.

Charles Gillot (1853-1903) was a French inventor and avid collector of ancient and medieval works of art. His father, Firmin Gillot, invented “gillotage” a type of relief photoengraving that revolutionized book publishing; allowing simultaneous printing of text and images. Like father like son, Charles later made technical improvements upon this process, while concurrently amassing an immense amount of important art works. 

Following Gillot’s death, Durand-Ruel gallery in Paris conducted two auction sales of his collection primarily made up of Asian objects as well as Islamic antiquities. The 1904 sale received high praise from many notable figures of the time such as the Goncourt brothers, calling it “the most perfect, the most sophisticated Japanese collection.”

These beautiful auction catalogs are massive. Bound in two catalogs comprised of 3,453 lots—the delicate illustrations, marbled paper, and leather embossed horse are really something to behold!

The remainder of his collection was found 104 years after the original sale and Christie’s held the sale in 2008—owned by The Frick, one of our NYARC partners. 

Posted by Kim Loconto

There is still time to sign up for the Women in the Arts benefit luncheon on Wednesday, October 22. Co-Awardees, Lena Dunham, and her mother, artist Laurie Simmons, received awards for their leadership and innovation in the arts in 2013. This year we are delighted to be honoring another tremendous mother-daughter duo, contemporary art collector extraordinaire, Mera Rubell, and renowned artist, Jennifer Rubell. 

Ticketsare still available to the awards program and seated luncheon with Mera, Jennifer, and many friends of the Museum and the Elizabeth A. Sackler Centerfor Feminist Art. To purchase tickets and for questions, please call (718) 501-6409, special.events@brooklynmuseum.org or click here. These events are always so remarkable and memorable and we hope you can join us.

We celebrate our annual #WomenintheArts benefit luncheon with a new yomeryl #GIF of last year’s co-honoree #LenaDunham!

Posted by Inga Glodowski

This weekend the Brooklyn Museum is joining together with MAPP International Productions and 651 ARTS to co-present a very timely discussion on Black femininity called Triple Consciousness. Rasu Jilani, Director of Community Programs at MAPP International Productions, shares about how the idea for the three-part series was sparked:
"In 2013, I attended a Park Armory work-in-progress presentation of Ralph Lemon’s Scaffold Room, produced by MAPP International Productions. The performance addressed ideas of the archetypal Black female in America culture, and I found myself experiencing various streams of consciousness.
I was left with a question: ‘What impact does the Black woman’s image in pop culture have on America?’ I explored the idea for several months before approaching Shay Wafer of 651 ARTS with the idea of producing a discussion about Black femininity. Shay explained that 651 ARTS was producing the Geneva Project directed by Charlotte Brathwaite, which also seeks to examine black femininity through the lens of cultural remembrance. We expanded the concept to focus on themes of Black female identity, and commissioned Ebony Noelle Golden to curate the program. These collaborative efforts make Triple Consciousness a platform for exercising the democratic voice in re-imagining Black female identity in America.”

Posted by Alicia BoonePhoto: Ralph Lemon

If you can’t make it to the Museum this Saturday for the first part in this series: Body Rock, we will be streaming the event live. Tune in and join in on the discussion!
ZoomInfo
This weekend the Brooklyn Museum is joining together with MAPP International Productions and 651 ARTS to co-present a very timely discussion on Black femininity called Triple Consciousness. Rasu Jilani, Director of Community Programs at MAPP International Productions, shares about how the idea for the three-part series was sparked:
"In 2013, I attended a Park Armory work-in-progress presentation of Ralph Lemon’s Scaffold Room, produced by MAPP International Productions. The performance addressed ideas of the archetypal Black female in America culture, and I found myself experiencing various streams of consciousness.
I was left with a question: ‘What impact does the Black woman’s image in pop culture have on America?’ I explored the idea for several months before approaching Shay Wafer of 651 ARTS with the idea of producing a discussion about Black femininity. Shay explained that 651 ARTS was producing the Geneva Project directed by Charlotte Brathwaite, which also seeks to examine black femininity through the lens of cultural remembrance. We expanded the concept to focus on themes of Black female identity, and commissioned Ebony Noelle Golden to curate the program. These collaborative efforts make Triple Consciousness a platform for exercising the democratic voice in re-imagining Black female identity in America.”

Posted by Alicia BoonePhoto: Ralph Lemon

If you can’t make it to the Museum this Saturday for the first part in this series: Body Rock, we will be streaming the event live. Tune in and join in on the discussion!
ZoomInfo

This weekend the Brooklyn Museum is joining together with MAPP International Productions and 651 ARTS to co-present a very timely discussion on Black femininity called Triple Consciousness. Rasu Jilani, Director of Community Programs at MAPP International Productions, shares about how the idea for the three-part series was sparked:

"In 2013, I attended a Park Armory work-in-progress presentation of Ralph Lemon’s Scaffold Room, produced by MAPP International Productions. The performance addressed ideas of the archetypal Black female in America culture, and I found myself experiencing various streams of consciousness.

I was left with a question: ‘What impact does the Black woman’s image in pop culture have on America?’ I explored the idea for several months before approaching Shay Wafer of 651 ARTS with the idea of producing a discussion about Black femininity. Shay explained that 651 ARTS was producing the Geneva Project directed by Charlotte Brathwaite, which also seeks to examine black femininity through the lens of cultural remembrance. We expanded the concept to focus on themes of Black female identity, and commissioned Ebony Noelle Golden to curate the program. These collaborative efforts make Triple Consciousness a platform for exercising the democratic voice in re-imagining Black female identity in America.”

Posted by Alicia Boone
Photo: Ralph Lemon

If you can’t make it to the Museum this Saturday for the first part in this series: Body Rock, we will be streaming the event live. Tune in and join in on the discussion!

My absolute favorite part about the museum’s trip to Côte d’Ivoire was the opportunity to see contemporary cloth production in cooperatives and weaving centers throughout the country. Weaving is the interlacing of two perpendicular sets of threads—the warp and weft—to create a textile. All looms have a means to separate threads to assist in the interlacing process, including the use of wood-sculpted heddle-pulleys.
Contemporary textiles by Baule weavers speckle the drive north from the capital city of Yamoussoukro. In Bomizambo, hundreds of weavers work on standing double-heddle looms to create narrow cotton bands from warp threads.  The surface of the narrow bands are decorated with varied embroidered motifs and are eventually sewn together to form larger panels. In nearby Lolobo, textiles are collaborative endeavors between Baule weavers and neighboring Dioula dyers. Warp threads used by Baule weavers are first dyed with indigo colorant (in a traditional technique called ikat) by Dioula dyers.
Further north, in the weaving center of Waraniéné, we saw looms outfitted with several carved figurative heddle pulleys. I’ve seen the museum’s superb collection of historical figurative Heddle Pulleys many times in storage, but it was a real treat for me to see pulleys firsthand and in context! 


Posted by Roger Arnold
ZoomInfo
My absolute favorite part about the museum’s trip to Côte d’Ivoire was the opportunity to see contemporary cloth production in cooperatives and weaving centers throughout the country. Weaving is the interlacing of two perpendicular sets of threads—the warp and weft—to create a textile. All looms have a means to separate threads to assist in the interlacing process, including the use of wood-sculpted heddle-pulleys.
Contemporary textiles by Baule weavers speckle the drive north from the capital city of Yamoussoukro. In Bomizambo, hundreds of weavers work on standing double-heddle looms to create narrow cotton bands from warp threads.  The surface of the narrow bands are decorated with varied embroidered motifs and are eventually sewn together to form larger panels. In nearby Lolobo, textiles are collaborative endeavors between Baule weavers and neighboring Dioula dyers. Warp threads used by Baule weavers are first dyed with indigo colorant (in a traditional technique called ikat) by Dioula dyers.
Further north, in the weaving center of Waraniéné, we saw looms outfitted with several carved figurative heddle pulleys. I’ve seen the museum’s superb collection of historical figurative Heddle Pulleys many times in storage, but it was a real treat for me to see pulleys firsthand and in context! 


Posted by Roger Arnold
ZoomInfo
My absolute favorite part about the museum’s trip to Côte d’Ivoire was the opportunity to see contemporary cloth production in cooperatives and weaving centers throughout the country. Weaving is the interlacing of two perpendicular sets of threads—the warp and weft—to create a textile. All looms have a means to separate threads to assist in the interlacing process, including the use of wood-sculpted heddle-pulleys.
Contemporary textiles by Baule weavers speckle the drive north from the capital city of Yamoussoukro. In Bomizambo, hundreds of weavers work on standing double-heddle looms to create narrow cotton bands from warp threads.  The surface of the narrow bands are decorated with varied embroidered motifs and are eventually sewn together to form larger panels. In nearby Lolobo, textiles are collaborative endeavors between Baule weavers and neighboring Dioula dyers. Warp threads used by Baule weavers are first dyed with indigo colorant (in a traditional technique called ikat) by Dioula dyers.
Further north, in the weaving center of Waraniéné, we saw looms outfitted with several carved figurative heddle pulleys. I’ve seen the museum’s superb collection of historical figurative Heddle Pulleys many times in storage, but it was a real treat for me to see pulleys firsthand and in context! 


Posted by Roger Arnold
ZoomInfo

My absolute favorite part about the museum’s trip to Côte d’Ivoire was the opportunity to see contemporary cloth production in cooperatives and weaving centers throughout the country. Weaving is the interlacing of two perpendicular sets of threads—the warp and weft—to create a textile. All looms have a means to separate threads to assist in the interlacing process, including the use of wood-sculpted heddle-pulleys.

Contemporary textiles by Baule weavers speckle the drive north from the capital city of Yamoussoukro. In Bomizambo, hundreds of weavers work on standing double-heddle looms to create narrow cotton bands from warp threads.  The surface of the narrow bands are decorated with varied embroidered motifs and are eventually sewn together to form larger panels. In nearby Lolobo, textiles are collaborative endeavors between Baule weavers and neighboring Dioula dyers. Warp threads used by Baule weavers are first dyed with indigo colorant (in a traditional technique called ikat) by Dioula dyers.

Further north, in the weaving center of Waraniéné, we saw looms outfitted with several carved figurative heddle pulleys. I’ve seen the museum’s superb collection of historical figurative Heddle Pulleys many times in storage, but it was a real treat for me to see pulleys firsthand and in context!

Posted by Roger Arnold

Over the past few years I have been hearing about these awesome brunch parties happening in Manhattan called Everyday People. Good people and good vibes and totally Brooklyn. We are thrilled to be collaborating with them to offer an afterwork dance party at the museum. Saada Ahmed, one of the organizers was able to sum up the vibe that we are creating for you on Thursday (10/16) perfectly:
"Love art? Love music? This Thursday October 16th Everyday People NYC is very excited to announce, Everyday People x Brooklyn Museum dance party! We invite you to tour Brooklyn Museum’s amazing exhibitions and cap off your cultural exploration with an Everyday People dance party! Music by Dj Moma and Dj Rich Knight, and surprise guest Dj. Hosted by Chef Roble and Saada with a special live performance by Charlie Red!"
This dance party is not to be missed!

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo
Over the past few years I have been hearing about these awesome brunch parties happening in Manhattan called Everyday People. Good people and good vibes and totally Brooklyn. We are thrilled to be collaborating with them to offer an afterwork dance party at the museum. Saada Ahmed, one of the organizers was able to sum up the vibe that we are creating for you on Thursday (10/16) perfectly:
"Love art? Love music? This Thursday October 16th Everyday People NYC is very excited to announce, Everyday People x Brooklyn Museum dance party! We invite you to tour Brooklyn Museum’s amazing exhibitions and cap off your cultural exploration with an Everyday People dance party! Music by Dj Moma and Dj Rich Knight, and surprise guest Dj. Hosted by Chef Roble and Saada with a special live performance by Charlie Red!"
This dance party is not to be missed!

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo
Over the past few years I have been hearing about these awesome brunch parties happening in Manhattan called Everyday People. Good people and good vibes and totally Brooklyn. We are thrilled to be collaborating with them to offer an afterwork dance party at the museum. Saada Ahmed, one of the organizers was able to sum up the vibe that we are creating for you on Thursday (10/16) perfectly:
"Love art? Love music? This Thursday October 16th Everyday People NYC is very excited to announce, Everyday People x Brooklyn Museum dance party! We invite you to tour Brooklyn Museum’s amazing exhibitions and cap off your cultural exploration with an Everyday People dance party! Music by Dj Moma and Dj Rich Knight, and surprise guest Dj. Hosted by Chef Roble and Saada with a special live performance by Charlie Red!"
This dance party is not to be missed!

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo

Over the past few years I have been hearing about these awesome brunch parties happening in Manhattan called Everyday People. Good people and good vibes and totally Brooklyn. We are thrilled to be collaborating with them to offer an afterwork dance party at the museum. Saada Ahmed, one of the organizers was able to sum up the vibe that we are creating for you on Thursday (10/16) perfectly:

"Love art? Love music? This Thursday October 16th Everyday People NYC is very excited to announce, Everyday People x Brooklyn Museum dance party! We invite you to tour Brooklyn Museum’s amazing exhibitions and cap off your cultural exploration with an Everyday People dance party! Music by Dj Moma and Dj Rich Knight, and surprise guest Dj. Hosted by Chef Roble and Saada with a special live performance by Charlie Red!"

This dance party is not to be missed!

Posted by Alicia Boone

Libraries and Archives is proud to introduce a new series, Hot Type Thursday. On the first Thursday of each month we will post an interesting acquisition from our collections.  
For our first installment, to coincide with the Wilbour Library of Egyptology’s 80th birthday, we present Walls of Freedom: Street Art of the Egyptian Revolutiona colorful and powerful survey of modern Egyptian street art “telling the story of the revolution with striking images of art that turned Egypt’s walls into a visual testimony of bravery and resistance.”
The library has many books, documents, and images related to graffiti in our collections and this new book reminded us of a wonderful exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum in the early 1970s.
The exhibition, Akhenaten and Nefertiti: Art From the Age of the Sun King had an accompanying book published entitled Nefertiti Graffiti: Notes on an Exhibition that included Visitors’ comments on the exhibition. Some of the most notable comments were left by children:
 “I Loved it!! It’s great. This is what I call Egyptology. I want to become an Egyptologist. P.S. Nefertiti and Ankenaten [sic] are beautiful for a begginner [sic] !”
“Good but to [sic] much rocks.”
Makes you wonder… where are they now?

Posted by Kim Loconto
ZoomInfo
Libraries and Archives is proud to introduce a new series, Hot Type Thursday. On the first Thursday of each month we will post an interesting acquisition from our collections.  
For our first installment, to coincide with the Wilbour Library of Egyptology’s 80th birthday, we present Walls of Freedom: Street Art of the Egyptian Revolutiona colorful and powerful survey of modern Egyptian street art “telling the story of the revolution with striking images of art that turned Egypt’s walls into a visual testimony of bravery and resistance.”
The library has many books, documents, and images related to graffiti in our collections and this new book reminded us of a wonderful exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum in the early 1970s.
The exhibition, Akhenaten and Nefertiti: Art From the Age of the Sun King had an accompanying book published entitled Nefertiti Graffiti: Notes on an Exhibition that included Visitors’ comments on the exhibition. Some of the most notable comments were left by children:
 “I Loved it!! It’s great. This is what I call Egyptology. I want to become an Egyptologist. P.S. Nefertiti and Ankenaten [sic] are beautiful for a begginner [sic] !”
“Good but to [sic] much rocks.”
Makes you wonder… where are they now?

Posted by Kim Loconto
ZoomInfo
Libraries and Archives is proud to introduce a new series, Hot Type Thursday. On the first Thursday of each month we will post an interesting acquisition from our collections.  
For our first installment, to coincide with the Wilbour Library of Egyptology’s 80th birthday, we present Walls of Freedom: Street Art of the Egyptian Revolutiona colorful and powerful survey of modern Egyptian street art “telling the story of the revolution with striking images of art that turned Egypt’s walls into a visual testimony of bravery and resistance.”
The library has many books, documents, and images related to graffiti in our collections and this new book reminded us of a wonderful exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum in the early 1970s.
The exhibition, Akhenaten and Nefertiti: Art From the Age of the Sun King had an accompanying book published entitled Nefertiti Graffiti: Notes on an Exhibition that included Visitors’ comments on the exhibition. Some of the most notable comments were left by children:
 “I Loved it!! It’s great. This is what I call Egyptology. I want to become an Egyptologist. P.S. Nefertiti and Ankenaten [sic] are beautiful for a begginner [sic] !”
“Good but to [sic] much rocks.”
Makes you wonder… where are they now?

Posted by Kim Loconto
ZoomInfo

Libraries and Archives is proud to introduce a new series, Hot Type Thursday. On the first Thursday of each month we will post an interesting acquisition from our collections.  

For our first installment, to coincide with the Wilbour Library of Egyptology’s 80th birthday, we present Walls of Freedom: Street Art of the Egyptian Revolutiona colorful and powerful survey of modern Egyptian street art “telling the story of the revolution with striking images of art that turned Egypt’s walls into a visual testimony of bravery and resistance.”

The library has many books, documents, and images related to graffiti in our collections and this new book reminded us of a wonderful exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum in the early 1970s.

The exhibition, Akhenaten and Nefertiti: Art From the Age of the Sun King had an accompanying book published entitled Nefertiti Graffiti: Notes on an Exhibition that included Visitors’ comments on the exhibition. Some of the most notable comments were left by children:

 “I Loved it!! It’s great. This is what I call Egyptology. I want to become an Egyptologist. P.S. Nefertiti and Ankenaten [sic] are beautiful for a begginner [sic] !

Good but to [sic] much rocks.

Makes you wonder… where are they now?

Posted by Kim Loconto

After a hiatus in September due to the West Indian Day Parade festivities, Target First Saturday is back in full effect to celebrate Latino heritage and culture! We have collaborated with #CrossingBrooklyn artists as well as local Brooklyn organizations to bring you the best of the best from the borough and beyond. 

Natalia Linares, creator of conrazón, builds platforms, bridges, and translations for worldwide digital era global pop culture and arts for what she calls “Now America.” Two artists she develops, Oakland-via-Panama’s Los Rakas and New York City’s La Mecánica Popular, will be playing this Saturday 10/4 at #Target1stSat ¡Viva Brooklyn! and Nati recently shared her excitement about the upcoming showcase:
I’m thrilled to be a small part of this week’s event! My work with conrazón came about as a way to advocate and create opportunities for what I call ‘diasporadical artists’ to get their music heard beyond the structures created for them. The pioneering acts Los Rakas and La Mecánica Popular are being themselves in extremely categorized times. This isn’t Latino music for Hispanic Heritage Month alone. Rather, I invite you to unlearn perhaps what you’ve been taught about these cultures and preview the spirit of a glowing and growing next generation of soul music in America. 

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo
After a hiatus in September due to the West Indian Day Parade festivities, Target First Saturday is back in full effect to celebrate Latino heritage and culture! We have collaborated with #CrossingBrooklyn artists as well as local Brooklyn organizations to bring you the best of the best from the borough and beyond. 

Natalia Linares, creator of conrazón, builds platforms, bridges, and translations for worldwide digital era global pop culture and arts for what she calls “Now America.” Two artists she develops, Oakland-via-Panama’s Los Rakas and New York City’s La Mecánica Popular, will be playing this Saturday 10/4 at #Target1stSat ¡Viva Brooklyn! and Nati recently shared her excitement about the upcoming showcase:
I’m thrilled to be a small part of this week’s event! My work with conrazón came about as a way to advocate and create opportunities for what I call ‘diasporadical artists’ to get their music heard beyond the structures created for them. The pioneering acts Los Rakas and La Mecánica Popular are being themselves in extremely categorized times. This isn’t Latino music for Hispanic Heritage Month alone. Rather, I invite you to unlearn perhaps what you’ve been taught about these cultures and preview the spirit of a glowing and growing next generation of soul music in America. 

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo
After a hiatus in September due to the West Indian Day Parade festivities, Target First Saturday is back in full effect to celebrate Latino heritage and culture! We have collaborated with #CrossingBrooklyn artists as well as local Brooklyn organizations to bring you the best of the best from the borough and beyond. 

Natalia Linares, creator of conrazón, builds platforms, bridges, and translations for worldwide digital era global pop culture and arts for what she calls “Now America.” Two artists she develops, Oakland-via-Panama’s Los Rakas and New York City’s La Mecánica Popular, will be playing this Saturday 10/4 at #Target1stSat ¡Viva Brooklyn! and Nati recently shared her excitement about the upcoming showcase:
I’m thrilled to be a small part of this week’s event! My work with conrazón came about as a way to advocate and create opportunities for what I call ‘diasporadical artists’ to get their music heard beyond the structures created for them. The pioneering acts Los Rakas and La Mecánica Popular are being themselves in extremely categorized times. This isn’t Latino music for Hispanic Heritage Month alone. Rather, I invite you to unlearn perhaps what you’ve been taught about these cultures and preview the spirit of a glowing and growing next generation of soul music in America. 

Posted by Alicia Boone
ZoomInfo

After a hiatus in September due to the West Indian Day Parade festivities, Target First Saturday is back in full effect to celebrate Latino heritage and culture! We have collaborated with #CrossingBrooklyn artists as well as local Brooklyn organizations to bring you the best of the best from the borough and beyond. 


Natalia Linares, creator of conrazón, builds platforms, bridges, and translations for worldwide digital era global pop culture and arts for what she calls “Now America.” Two artists she develops, Oakland-via-Panama’s Los Rakas and New York City’s La Mecánica Popular, will be playing this Saturday 10/4 at #Target1stSat ¡Viva Brooklyn! and Nati recently shared her excitement about the upcoming showcase:

I’m thrilled to be a small part of this week’s event! My work with conrazón came about as a way to advocate and create opportunities for what I call ‘diasporadical artists’ to get their music heard beyond the structures created for them. The pioneering acts Los Rakas and La Mecánica Popular are being themselves in extremely categorized times. This isn’t Latino music for Hispanic Heritage Month alone. Rather, I invite you to unlearn perhaps what you’ve been taught about these cultures and preview the spirit of a glowing and growing next generation of soul music in America. 

Posted by Alicia Boone

This summer’s museum trip to Côte d’Ivoire introduced us to Ivoirian artists and gave me the chance to see art works that I have come to know well as museum objects in new contexts. We commissioned masquerades in each of the three primary cultural regions visited―giving us the rare chance to see this performance art in action.
In the Dan village of Booni, near the Liberian border, a graceful dean gle mask performed. Dean gle plays a peacemaking role in the community―a beautiful example from our collection is at upper right. In Bendekouassikro, in central Baule country, the town’s renowned mask company (note the t-shirt and blue and white woven skirt of the man on the lower left) fêted us with goli, typically a day-long series of jubilant entertainment dances, featuring four pairs of masked dancers. We visited on a Wednesday, the day typically taken away from farming, which meant that the entire community took part. Finally, in Waraniéné in the north, Senufo performers shared a nufori dance, in which performers in full-body panther costumes (themselves members of the secret Poro society) both frighten and entertain with their deft acrobatic gestures.
Clips from all three days of performance will be on view when Double Take: African Innovations, our reinstallation of Brooklyn’s African collection, opens on October 29th.


Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo
This summer’s museum trip to Côte d’Ivoire introduced us to Ivoirian artists and gave me the chance to see art works that I have come to know well as museum objects in new contexts. We commissioned masquerades in each of the three primary cultural regions visited―giving us the rare chance to see this performance art in action.
In the Dan village of Booni, near the Liberian border, a graceful dean gle mask performed. Dean gle plays a peacemaking role in the community―a beautiful example from our collection is at upper right. In Bendekouassikro, in central Baule country, the town’s renowned mask company (note the t-shirt and blue and white woven skirt of the man on the lower left) fêted us with goli, typically a day-long series of jubilant entertainment dances, featuring four pairs of masked dancers. We visited on a Wednesday, the day typically taken away from farming, which meant that the entire community took part. Finally, in Waraniéné in the north, Senufo performers shared a nufori dance, in which performers in full-body panther costumes (themselves members of the secret Poro society) both frighten and entertain with their deft acrobatic gestures.
Clips from all three days of performance will be on view when Double Take: African Innovations, our reinstallation of Brooklyn’s African collection, opens on October 29th.


Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo
This summer’s museum trip to Côte d’Ivoire introduced us to Ivoirian artists and gave me the chance to see art works that I have come to know well as museum objects in new contexts. We commissioned masquerades in each of the three primary cultural regions visited―giving us the rare chance to see this performance art in action.
In the Dan village of Booni, near the Liberian border, a graceful dean gle mask performed. Dean gle plays a peacemaking role in the community―a beautiful example from our collection is at upper right. In Bendekouassikro, in central Baule country, the town’s renowned mask company (note the t-shirt and blue and white woven skirt of the man on the lower left) fêted us with goli, typically a day-long series of jubilant entertainment dances, featuring four pairs of masked dancers. We visited on a Wednesday, the day typically taken away from farming, which meant that the entire community took part. Finally, in Waraniéné in the north, Senufo performers shared a nufori dance, in which performers in full-body panther costumes (themselves members of the secret Poro society) both frighten and entertain with their deft acrobatic gestures.
Clips from all three days of performance will be on view when Double Take: African Innovations, our reinstallation of Brooklyn’s African collection, opens on October 29th.


Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo
This summer’s museum trip to Côte d’Ivoire introduced us to Ivoirian artists and gave me the chance to see art works that I have come to know well as museum objects in new contexts. We commissioned masquerades in each of the three primary cultural regions visited―giving us the rare chance to see this performance art in action.
In the Dan village of Booni, near the Liberian border, a graceful dean gle mask performed. Dean gle plays a peacemaking role in the community―a beautiful example from our collection is at upper right. In Bendekouassikro, in central Baule country, the town’s renowned mask company (note the t-shirt and blue and white woven skirt of the man on the lower left) fêted us with goli, typically a day-long series of jubilant entertainment dances, featuring four pairs of masked dancers. We visited on a Wednesday, the day typically taken away from farming, which meant that the entire community took part. Finally, in Waraniéné in the north, Senufo performers shared a nufori dance, in which performers in full-body panther costumes (themselves members of the secret Poro society) both frighten and entertain with their deft acrobatic gestures.
Clips from all three days of performance will be on view when Double Take: African Innovations, our reinstallation of Brooklyn’s African collection, opens on October 29th.


Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle
ZoomInfo

This summer’s museum trip to Côte d’Ivoire introduced us to Ivoirian artists and gave me the chance to see art works that I have come to know well as museum objects in new contexts. We commissioned masquerades in each of the three primary cultural regions visited―giving us the rare chance to see this performance art in action.

In the Dan village of Booni, near the Liberian border, a graceful dean gle mask performed. Dean gle plays a peacemaking role in the communitya beautiful example from our collection is at upper right. In Bendekouassikro, in central Baule country, the town’s renowned mask company (note the t-shirt and blue and white woven skirt of the man on the lower left) fêted us with goli, typically a day-long series of jubilant entertainment dances, featuring four pairs of masked dancers. We visited on a Wednesday, the day typically taken away from farming, which meant that the entire community took part. Finally, in Waraniéné in the north, Senufo performers shared a nufori dance, in which performers in full-body panther costumes (themselves members of the secret Poro society) both frighten and entertain with their deft acrobatic gestures.

Clips from all three days of performance will be on view when Double Take: African Innovations, our reinstallation of Brooklyn’s African collection, opens on October 29th.

Posted by Kevin Dumouchelle

The dip in temperature means it’s almost time to say farewell to the Sackler Center’s current exhibition Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work, 1963-1974. This show provides a unique opportunity to see Chicago’s evolution as an artist, and to experience her most famous work, The Dinner Party, in the context of her journey from minimalism to feminism.  It has been exciting to introduce audiences to aspects of Chicago’s work that were not well known on the East Coast, particularly her ephemeral, site-specific outdoor Atmosphere pieces from the 1960s and 70s. In addition to showing historic photographs of this series, on April 26, 2014, we were thrilled to welcome nearly ten thousand people to Prospect Park’s Long Meadow to experience a new Atmosphere work. A Butterfly for Brooklyn, which expanded on Chicago’s 1974 A Butterfly for Oakland, featured a 200-foot wide by 180-foot high sparkling, exploding butterfly, Chicago’s largest installationever. This monumental public project and our exhibition were part of a year of activities celebrating Chicago’s seventy-fifth birthday.
While Chicago in L.A. closes on September 28, the section devoted to her groundbreaking teaching and institution-building projects, Judy Chicago’s Feminist Pedagogy and Alternative Spaces, will remain on view in the Herstory Gallery through November 16. Up next in the main galleries, Judith Scott – Bound and Unbound opens October 24! 

Posted by Saisha M. Grayson
ZoomInfo
The dip in temperature means it’s almost time to say farewell to the Sackler Center’s current exhibition Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work, 1963-1974. This show provides a unique opportunity to see Chicago’s evolution as an artist, and to experience her most famous work, The Dinner Party, in the context of her journey from minimalism to feminism.  It has been exciting to introduce audiences to aspects of Chicago’s work that were not well known on the East Coast, particularly her ephemeral, site-specific outdoor Atmosphere pieces from the 1960s and 70s. In addition to showing historic photographs of this series, on April 26, 2014, we were thrilled to welcome nearly ten thousand people to Prospect Park’s Long Meadow to experience a new Atmosphere work. A Butterfly for Brooklyn, which expanded on Chicago’s 1974 A Butterfly for Oakland, featured a 200-foot wide by 180-foot high sparkling, exploding butterfly, Chicago’s largest installationever. This monumental public project and our exhibition were part of a year of activities celebrating Chicago’s seventy-fifth birthday.
While Chicago in L.A. closes on September 28, the section devoted to her groundbreaking teaching and institution-building projects, Judy Chicago’s Feminist Pedagogy and Alternative Spaces, will remain on view in the Herstory Gallery through November 16. Up next in the main galleries, Judith Scott – Bound and Unbound opens October 24! 

Posted by Saisha M. Grayson
ZoomInfo
The dip in temperature means it’s almost time to say farewell to the Sackler Center’s current exhibition Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work, 1963-1974. This show provides a unique opportunity to see Chicago’s evolution as an artist, and to experience her most famous work, The Dinner Party, in the context of her journey from minimalism to feminism.  It has been exciting to introduce audiences to aspects of Chicago’s work that were not well known on the East Coast, particularly her ephemeral, site-specific outdoor Atmosphere pieces from the 1960s and 70s. In addition to showing historic photographs of this series, on April 26, 2014, we were thrilled to welcome nearly ten thousand people to Prospect Park’s Long Meadow to experience a new Atmosphere work. A Butterfly for Brooklyn, which expanded on Chicago’s 1974 A Butterfly for Oakland, featured a 200-foot wide by 180-foot high sparkling, exploding butterfly, Chicago’s largest installationever. This monumental public project and our exhibition were part of a year of activities celebrating Chicago’s seventy-fifth birthday.
While Chicago in L.A. closes on September 28, the section devoted to her groundbreaking teaching and institution-building projects, Judy Chicago’s Feminist Pedagogy and Alternative Spaces, will remain on view in the Herstory Gallery through November 16. Up next in the main galleries, Judith Scott – Bound and Unbound opens October 24! 

Posted by Saisha M. Grayson
ZoomInfo
The dip in temperature means it’s almost time to say farewell to the Sackler Center’s current exhibition Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work, 1963-1974. This show provides a unique opportunity to see Chicago’s evolution as an artist, and to experience her most famous work, The Dinner Party, in the context of her journey from minimalism to feminism.  It has been exciting to introduce audiences to aspects of Chicago’s work that were not well known on the East Coast, particularly her ephemeral, site-specific outdoor Atmosphere pieces from the 1960s and 70s. In addition to showing historic photographs of this series, on April 26, 2014, we were thrilled to welcome nearly ten thousand people to Prospect Park’s Long Meadow to experience a new Atmosphere work. A Butterfly for Brooklyn, which expanded on Chicago’s 1974 A Butterfly for Oakland, featured a 200-foot wide by 180-foot high sparkling, exploding butterfly, Chicago’s largest installationever. This monumental public project and our exhibition were part of a year of activities celebrating Chicago’s seventy-fifth birthday.
While Chicago in L.A. closes on September 28, the section devoted to her groundbreaking teaching and institution-building projects, Judy Chicago’s Feminist Pedagogy and Alternative Spaces, will remain on view in the Herstory Gallery through November 16. Up next in the main galleries, Judith Scott – Bound and Unbound opens October 24! 

Posted by Saisha M. Grayson
ZoomInfo

The dip in temperature means it’s almost time to say farewell to the Sackler Center’s current exhibition Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work, 1963-1974. This show provides a unique opportunity to see Chicago’s evolution as an artist, and to experience her most famous work, The Dinner Party, in the context of her journey from minimalism to feminism.  It has been exciting to introduce audiences to aspects of Chicago’s work that were not well known on the East Coast, particularly her ephemeral, site-specific outdoor Atmosphere pieces from the 1960s and 70s. In addition to showing historic photographs of this series, on April 26, 2014, we were thrilled to welcome nearly ten thousand people to Prospect Park’s Long Meadow to experience a new Atmosphere work. A Butterfly for Brooklyn, which expanded on Chicago’s 1974 A Butterfly for Oakland, featured a 200-foot wide by 180-foot high sparkling, exploding butterfly, Chicago’s largest installationever. This monumental public project and our exhibition were part of a year of activities celebrating Chicago’s seventy-fifth birthday.

While Chicago in L.A. closes on September 28, the section devoted to her groundbreaking teaching and institution-building projects, Judy Chicago’s Feminist Pedagogy and Alternative Spaces, will remain on view in the Herstory Gallery through November 16. Up next in the main galleries, Judith Scott – Bound and Unbound opens October 24! 

Posted by Saisha M. Grayson

Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo

Installing the works of 35 artists and collectives can take some time! Slowly but surely, all the pieces are coming together and we’re very excited for #CrossingBrooklyn to open next week (10/3).

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler

This summer the museum’s Gallery Studio Program launched an innovative class for kids ages 11-13 called Forward Thinking: 3D Printing, generously funded by Deutsche Bank. Students were selected to present at World Maker Faire, a massive celebration of technologists and makers hosted at the New York Hall of Science. 
Six children represented the class on the Education Stage. They engaged with audience members and described their thoughts and memories about museum artworks, individual and collaborative projects, and what it was like to develop a digital skill set through creative art challenges.
In case you missed it, you can view the presentation here!


Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
This summer the museum’s Gallery Studio Program launched an innovative class for kids ages 11-13 called Forward Thinking: 3D Printing, generously funded by Deutsche Bank. Students were selected to present at World Maker Faire, a massive celebration of technologists and makers hosted at the New York Hall of Science. 
Six children represented the class on the Education Stage. They engaged with audience members and described their thoughts and memories about museum artworks, individual and collaborative projects, and what it was like to develop a digital skill set through creative art challenges.
In case you missed it, you can view the presentation here!


Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
This summer the museum’s Gallery Studio Program launched an innovative class for kids ages 11-13 called Forward Thinking: 3D Printing, generously funded by Deutsche Bank. Students were selected to present at World Maker Faire, a massive celebration of technologists and makers hosted at the New York Hall of Science. 
Six children represented the class on the Education Stage. They engaged with audience members and described their thoughts and memories about museum artworks, individual and collaborative projects, and what it was like to develop a digital skill set through creative art challenges.
In case you missed it, you can view the presentation here!


Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo
This summer the museum’s Gallery Studio Program launched an innovative class for kids ages 11-13 called Forward Thinking: 3D Printing, generously funded by Deutsche Bank. Students were selected to present at World Maker Faire, a massive celebration of technologists and makers hosted at the New York Hall of Science. 
Six children represented the class on the Education Stage. They engaged with audience members and described their thoughts and memories about museum artworks, individual and collaborative projects, and what it was like to develop a digital skill set through creative art challenges.
In case you missed it, you can view the presentation here!


Posted by Ana Fernandez
ZoomInfo

This summer the museum’s Gallery Studio Program launched an innovative class for kids ages 11-13 called Forward Thinking: 3D Printing, generously funded by Deutsche Bank. Students were selected to present at World Maker Faire, a massive celebration of technologists and makers hosted at the New York Hall of Science.

Six children represented the class on the Education Stage. They engaged with audience members and described their thoughts and memories about museum artworks, individual and collaborative projects, and what it was like to develop a digital skill set through creative art challenges.

In case you missed it, you can view the presentation here!

Posted by Ana Fernandez

We are thrilled to be presenting Power Shift: Becoming an Artist Entrepreneur again this Fall. This will be our first workshop in a series of three. This fall’s sessions will focus on Branding, Building, and Launching your creative business. Janice Bond communications strategist, cultural producer, artist and founder of SAVANT | SAVANT will join us to present her workshop entitled YOUr Art, YOUr Brand, YOUr Business, YOUr Being. We were able to touch base will Janice earlier this week and she is thrilled to be partnering with us to present this workshop. Check out what she had to say:

"The first Power Shift dialogue is this Thursday, and only one word can truly describe my feelings about this… AMPED! I’m really looking forward to this skillshare — it is so important for arts entrepreneurs at any level to think and focus more closely on their brand equity and overall trajectory.

The global-local creative economy is a quite dynamic space with many layers. We will discuss positioning and authenticity, developing successful collaborations and teams, laying the foundation for your overall business strategy and more. Who said living life artfully had to be a lifelong economic challenge or personal compromise? Rise.”

Posted by Alicia Boone

Our current exhibition, Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe tells a beautiful story about high heels and the high heel wearers who have sashayed, suffered, and shined through the decades. There is no denying that the high heel is a provocative accessory that alludes to images of power, sex, and artistic expression. Sometimes seen as a fetish object and other times regarded as a lethal weapon, high heels have a fascinating and varied history!
Here in the Museum’s Libraries and Archives Special Collections we have unearthed our own #killerheels treasure from a rare book by T. Watson Greig showing sixty-three whimsical illustrations of ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century. You can view and download all sixty-three digitized images from Ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century: with sixty-three illustrations by visiting our online catalog.
If you like what you see, you can look at historical shoes from our library’s collection all year long with this 2015 compact easel desk calendar!

Posted by Kim Loconto
ZoomInfo
Our current exhibition, Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe tells a beautiful story about high heels and the high heel wearers who have sashayed, suffered, and shined through the decades. There is no denying that the high heel is a provocative accessory that alludes to images of power, sex, and artistic expression. Sometimes seen as a fetish object and other times regarded as a lethal weapon, high heels have a fascinating and varied history!
Here in the Museum’s Libraries and Archives Special Collections we have unearthed our own #killerheels treasure from a rare book by T. Watson Greig showing sixty-three whimsical illustrations of ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century. You can view and download all sixty-three digitized images from Ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century: with sixty-three illustrations by visiting our online catalog.
If you like what you see, you can look at historical shoes from our library’s collection all year long with this 2015 compact easel desk calendar!

Posted by Kim Loconto
ZoomInfo
Our current exhibition, Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe tells a beautiful story about high heels and the high heel wearers who have sashayed, suffered, and shined through the decades. There is no denying that the high heel is a provocative accessory that alludes to images of power, sex, and artistic expression. Sometimes seen as a fetish object and other times regarded as a lethal weapon, high heels have a fascinating and varied history!
Here in the Museum’s Libraries and Archives Special Collections we have unearthed our own #killerheels treasure from a rare book by T. Watson Greig showing sixty-three whimsical illustrations of ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century. You can view and download all sixty-three digitized images from Ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century: with sixty-three illustrations by visiting our online catalog.
If you like what you see, you can look at historical shoes from our library’s collection all year long with this 2015 compact easel desk calendar!

Posted by Kim Loconto
ZoomInfo

Our current exhibition, Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe tells a beautiful story about high heels and the high heel wearers who have sashayed, suffered, and shined through the decades. There is no denying that the high heel is a provocative accessory that alludes to images of power, sex, and artistic expression. Sometimes seen as a fetish object and other times regarded as a lethal weapon, high heels have a fascinating and varied history!

Here in the Museum’s Libraries and Archives Special Collections we have unearthed our own #killerheels treasure from a rare book by T. Watson Greig showing sixty-three whimsical illustrations of ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century. You can view and download all sixty-three digitized images from Ladies’ dress shoes of the nineteenth century: with sixty-three illustrations by visiting our online catalog.

If you like what you see, you can look at historical shoes from our library’s collection all year long with this 2015 compact easel desk calendar!

Posted by Kim Loconto