An Egyptian painted mummy shroud is undergoing an exciting conservation treatment. Over the next few months, Rita Berg will be discussing various stages along the way. Our last post focused on the identification of Egyptian blue using visible-induced luminescence (VIL). Today’s post will address the method used to remove the shroud from its old support.
During a previous restoration, the shroud fragment was sewn onto a secondary fabric support and mounted onto an acidic Masonite board. The Masonite has degraded over time, so it was removed and discarded, leaving the shroud fragment stitched to a deteriorating fabric support.  In order to prevent damage to the delicate paint and ground layers, it was necessary to release the original textile from the fabric support by removing stiches from the reverse.
To do this, conservators created a padded support made of nine removable parts, mounted on a wood stretcher, and the fragile textile was temporarily attached to the stretcher. This construction allowed the textile to remain flat and face-up, while the removable sections could be opened one at a time to access the reverse. Working from the below, the stitches were removed from the exposed sections of the reverse using scissors and tweezers.  Once the original was freed from the support, it was moved to a temporary storage box. Next step – Consolidation of the paint surface.

Posted by Rita Berg
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An Egyptian painted mummy shroud is undergoing an exciting conservation treatment. Over the next few months, Rita Berg will be discussing various stages along the way. Our last post focused on the identification of Egyptian blue using visible-induced luminescence (VIL). Today’s post will address the method used to remove the shroud from its old support.

During a previous restoration, the shroud fragment was sewn onto a secondary fabric support and mounted onto an acidic Masonite board. The Masonite has degraded over time, so it was removed and discarded, leaving the shroud fragment stitched to a deteriorating fabric support.  In order to prevent damage to the delicate paint and ground layers, it was necessary to release the original textile from the fabric support by removing stiches from the reverse.

To do this, conservators created a padded support made of nine removable parts, mounted on a wood stretcher, and the fragile textile was temporarily attached to the stretcher. This construction allowed the textile to remain flat and face-up, while the removable sections could be opened one at a time to access the reverse. Working from the below, the stitches were removed from the exposed sections of the reverse using scissors and tweezers.  Once the original was freed from the support, it was moved to a temporary storage box. Next step – Consolidation of the paint surface.

Posted by Rita Berg

Do you remember your first Swoon? brooklynstreetart invites you to Instavideo your “first Swoon” for a chance to attend a special meetup. Here’s how:

1. Make a video telling us about your first Swoon. Get creative! 
2. Post your video to Instagram 
3. Tag it #swoonstreetart
4. Register at bit.ly/swoonstreetart 

We look forward to seeing your videos!

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler

Fans of street art and Swoon, we’ve got an event for you!
This Thursday, Brooklyn Street Art founders Jaime Rojo (Left) and Steven P. Harrington (Right) will lead a dynamic multimedia conversation that explores the evolution of street art stories as told by the earliest graffiti writers to today’s D.I.Y. artists. They’ll reveal secret backgrounds, show what stylistic themes are recurring today, and hint at the future of street art in New York.
Joining @brooklynstreetart will be artists Swoon and Luna Park, and curator Keith Schweitzer. A reception with a DJ, cash bar, and a guest-inclusive art-making project will follow. More at bit.ly/BSAatBKM

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
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Fans of street art and Swoon, we’ve got an event for you!

This Thursday, Brooklyn Street Art founders Jaime Rojo (Left) and Steven P. Harrington (Right) will lead a dynamic multimedia conversation that explores the evolution of street art stories as told by the earliest graffiti writers to today’s D.I.Y. artists. They’ll reveal secret backgrounds, show what stylistic themes are recurring today, and hint at the future of street art in New York.

Joining @brooklynstreetart will be artists Swoon and Luna Park, and curator Keith Schweitzer. A reception with a DJ, cash bar, and a guest-inclusive art-making project will follow. More at bit.ly/BSAatBKM

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler

Judy Chicago’s upcoming pyrotechnic performance A Butterfly for Brooklyn is a continuation of a series of performances early on in her career. We asked Judy:In the late 60’s, what prompted you to create artworks with pyrotechnics?
JC: At the time, I was deeply involved in developing color systems to create emotive states and I wanted the color in my paintings and sculptures to become liberated from the forms in order to ‘soften’ and ‘feminize’ the decidedly macho Los Angeles art scene. Fireworks seemed the perfect technique.
Does the fact that this is the first East Coast iteration of your pyrotechnic pieces have an impact on the work for you?
JC: I’m thrilled that I have the opportunity to share my fireworks with the East Coast audience and to bring the imagery of ‘The Dinner Party” OUT of the museum and into public space.How will “A Butterfly for Brooklyn” expand on your earlier pyrotechnic pieces, A Butterfly for Oakland, 1974, and A Butterfly for Pomona, 2012? 
JC: When I stopped doing fireworks in 1974 it was because I could not garner enough support to create more complex pieces. The Getty sponsored “Pacific Standard Time” Performance Festival allowed me to pick up where I left off and I’ve waited 40 years to work at the level of complexity of “A Butterfly for Brooklyn.

Posted by Jess Wilcox.
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Judy Chicago’s upcoming pyrotechnic performance A Butterfly for Brooklyn is a continuation of a series of performances early on in her career. We asked Judy:In the late 60’s, what prompted you to create artworks with pyrotechnics?
JC: At the time, I was deeply involved in developing color systems to create emotive states and I wanted the color in my paintings and sculptures to become liberated from the forms in order to ‘soften’ and ‘feminize’ the decidedly macho Los Angeles art scene. Fireworks seemed the perfect technique.
Does the fact that this is the first East Coast iteration of your pyrotechnic pieces have an impact on the work for you?
JC: I’m thrilled that I have the opportunity to share my fireworks with the East Coast audience and to bring the imagery of ‘The Dinner Party” OUT of the museum and into public space.How will “A Butterfly for Brooklyn” expand on your earlier pyrotechnic pieces, A Butterfly for Oakland, 1974, and A Butterfly for Pomona, 2012? 
JC: When I stopped doing fireworks in 1974 it was because I could not garner enough support to create more complex pieces. The Getty sponsored “Pacific Standard Time” Performance Festival allowed me to pick up where I left off and I’ve waited 40 years to work at the level of complexity of “A Butterfly for Brooklyn.

Posted by Jess Wilcox.
ZoomInfo
Judy Chicago’s upcoming pyrotechnic performance A Butterfly for Brooklyn is a continuation of a series of performances early on in her career. We asked Judy:In the late 60’s, what prompted you to create artworks with pyrotechnics?
JC: At the time, I was deeply involved in developing color systems to create emotive states and I wanted the color in my paintings and sculptures to become liberated from the forms in order to ‘soften’ and ‘feminize’ the decidedly macho Los Angeles art scene. Fireworks seemed the perfect technique.
Does the fact that this is the first East Coast iteration of your pyrotechnic pieces have an impact on the work for you?
JC: I’m thrilled that I have the opportunity to share my fireworks with the East Coast audience and to bring the imagery of ‘The Dinner Party” OUT of the museum and into public space.How will “A Butterfly for Brooklyn” expand on your earlier pyrotechnic pieces, A Butterfly for Oakland, 1974, and A Butterfly for Pomona, 2012? 
JC: When I stopped doing fireworks in 1974 it was because I could not garner enough support to create more complex pieces. The Getty sponsored “Pacific Standard Time” Performance Festival allowed me to pick up where I left off and I’ve waited 40 years to work at the level of complexity of “A Butterfly for Brooklyn.

Posted by Jess Wilcox.
ZoomInfo

Judy Chicago’s upcoming pyrotechnic performance A Butterfly for Brooklyn is a continuation of a series of performances early on in her career. We asked Judy:

In the late 60’s, what prompted you to create artworks with pyrotechnics?

JC: At the time, I was deeply involved in developing color systems to create emotive states and I wanted the color in my paintings and sculptures to become liberated from the forms in order to ‘soften’ and ‘feminize’ the decidedly macho Los Angeles art scene. Fireworks seemed the perfect technique.

Does the fact that this is the first East Coast iteration of your pyrotechnic pieces have an impact on the work for you?

JC: I’m thrilled that I have the opportunity to share my fireworks with the East Coast audience and to bring the imagery of ‘The Dinner Party” OUT of the museum and into public space.

How will “A Butterfly for Brooklyn” expand on your earlier pyrotechnic pieces, A Butterfly for Oakland, 1974, and A Butterfly for Pomona, 2012? 

JC: When I stopped doing fireworks in 1974 it was because I could not garner enough support to create more complex pieces. The Getty sponsored “Pacific Standard Time” Performance Festival allowed me to pick up where I left off and I’ve waited 40 years to work at the level of complexity of “A Butterfly for Brooklyn.

Posted by Jess Wilcox.

Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
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Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo
Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler
ZoomInfo

Opening today, Ai Weiwei: According to What? features the work from one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists. Featuring over thirty works spanning more than twenty years, #AiWeiwei explores universal topics of culture, history, politics, and tradition, showcasing the artist’s remarkably interdisciplinary career as a photographer, sculptor, architect and activist.

Posted by Brooke Baldeschwiler

In the Sackler Center we are making preparations for Judy Chicago’s new pyrotechnic artwork, A Butterfly for Brooklyn, to be presented in Prospect Park’s Long Meadow on April 26th. The new piece reengages a series of works she began in the late 60’s called Atmospheres, which are presented through documentation in our current exhibition Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work 1963-74.

This video documents the piece A Butterfly for Pomona (2012) commissioned by The Getty’s Pacific Standard Time and gives you an idea of the visuals, scale and duration of the new piece. The exciting news is that A Butterfly for Brooklyn will be the most elaborate of her ephemeral environmental works to date.

Posted by Jess Wilcox.

Springtime is upon us and this year’s especially long winter makes us appreciate it even more so. The transition to warmer temperatures usually coincides with brighter colors all around us like pink, purple, peach, coral, and blue.

The Brooklyn Museum’s former Edward C. Blum Design Laboratory in Decorative Arts influenced fashion designers and manufacturers by making costume and textile works available to members for research. As a service to Design Lab members, the department staff produced color direction cards, or swatch samples, twice a year for designers in fashion and home interiors. In the Spring 1965 issue of Color Directions, pictured above, the forecast predicts:

“Pinks of all varieties will be featured in both apparel and home-furnishing market. While some amber tonalities will undoubtedly carry over from Fall 1964, clear pinks and rose reds, 296-311, look fresher. An old favorite, American Beauty, returns in a brighter version, 311.”

Photo: Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Costumes and Textiles: Edward C. Blum Design Laboratory. Swatches: Color Directions, Spring 1965.
Posted by Eunice Liu

A loop after a loop. Hour after hour my madness becomes crochet.” - says #BKArtistsBall artist Olek who covers people, objects and places in bright, cozy knits. Today she will cover our Instagram!

Here’s Olek on a fence in Red Hook, Whateverrrr (image © Jaime Rojo brooklynstreetart).

(Source: brooklynstreetart)

#BKArtistBall artist Nick van Woert is informed by his background in architecture and his fascination with antiquity - he cites Vitruvius, the early Roman architect who was inspired by nature, as a significant influence.
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#BKArtistBall artist Nick van Woert is informed by his background in architecture and his fascination with antiquity - he cites Vitruvius, the early Roman architect who was inspired by nature, as a significant influence.
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#BKArtistBall artist Nick van Woert is informed by his background in architecture and his fascination with antiquity - he cites Vitruvius, the early Roman architect who was inspired by nature, as a significant influence.

(Source: work.fourteensquarefeet.com)

"I’ve played so many video games and watched thousands of movies. It’s hard to know what memories happened to me and which come from other places." - #BKArtistsBall artist Jeremy Couillard on the digital-inspired worlds in his work.
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"I’ve played so many video games and watched thousands of movies. It’s hard to know what memories happened to me and which come from other places." - #BKArtistsBall artist Jeremy Couillard on the digital-inspired worlds in his work.
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"I’ve played so many video games and watched thousands of movies. It’s hard to know what memories happened to me and which come from other places." - #BKArtistsBall artist Jeremy Couillard on the digital-inspired worlds in his work.
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"I’ve played so many video games and watched thousands of movies. It’s hard to know what memories happened to me and which come from other places." - #BKArtistsBall artist Jeremy Couillard on the digital-inspired worlds in his work.

(Source: jeremycouillard.com)

#BKArtistsBall honoree  Kehinde Wiley depicts heroic modern figures in traditional formats. His use of colorful background patterns make specific reference to textiles and decorative patterns of various cultures, from 19th-century Judaica paper cutouts to Martha Stewart’s interior color swatches.

(Source: kehindewiley.com)